The Big Picture

NYTimes.com isn’t the only NYT prop­er­ty that’s doing inter­est­ing things with blogs these days – Boston.com launched a dif­fer­ent kind of pho­to blog ear­li­er this month, The Big Pic­ture. With its over­sized pho­tos, min­i­mal ads, and hard­ly a pro­mo to oth­er site con­tent, the pre­sen­ta­tion is clear and strik­ing – and praise is pour­ing in.

California Fires

Firefighters work to contain the Humboldt fire which started Wednesday, had grown to 19,000 acres and threatened more than 5,000 structures. (AP Photo/Jason Halley — Chico Enterprise-Record)

Anoth­er inter­est­ing facet about the blog is that it not writ­ten by a Globe pho­tog­ra­ph­er or pho­to edi­tor, but by one of their web­site devel­op­ers. Andy Baio post­ed a great inter­view with the blog’s cre­ator and author, Alan Tay­lor, where he dis­cuss­es his inspi­ra­tion, method­ol­o­gy, and what it’s like being a web devel­op­er work­ing in a journalist’s world. When asked why more news­pa­per sites haven’t done this before, he replied:

Even some of my favorite pho­to sites are often lim­it­ed to ‘Pho­to of the Day’ or ‘24 Hours in Pic­tures’ fea­tures. That’s inter­est­ing, and you can find some mind-blow­ing images there, but I always felt like it lacked con­text, depth, sto­ry.”

Iowa Floods

Brandon Smith carries his two cats, Fry and Bender, to dry land from their flooded and evacuated home on June 12, 2008 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Photo by David Greedy/Getty Images)

As we move to an age where motion graph­ics and video reg­u­lar­ly enhance our tra­di­tion­al news pre­sen­ta­tion, it’s inter­est­ing to take a step back and con­sid­er the pow­er still pho­tog­ra­phy has to tell a sto­ry. And work­ing online with­out the space con­straint of print, news orga­ni­za­tions have an oppor­tu­ni­ty to bring more depth and con­text to read­ers, through excel­lent pho­to­jour­nal­ism.

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