Monthly Archive for January, 2009

A New Whitehouse.gov, and New Typefaces

As of noon today, we have a new pres­i­dent, as well as a new WhiteHouse.gov. The much-admired, Gotham-based typo­graph­i­cal iden­ti­ty is gone, but as Jason San­ta Maria points out, the design­ers went instead with two oth­er type­faces from the same foundry: Whit­ney and Hoe­fler Text.

Anoth­er major redesign this week also involved the use of Whit­ney: kottke.org – though you’ll need to have the font installed on your machine in order to see it.

Which begs the ques­tion, Is Whit­ney the new Gotham? (Seems like just yes­ter­day we were ask­ing, Is Gotham the New Inter­state?)

Hoefler+Frere-Jones is on a roll.

U.S. Airways Jet Crashes Into Hudson River

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue

My photo from the 21st floor of the New York Times Building, in midtown.

From City Room:

A USAir­ways plane that took off at 3:26 p.m. from La Guardia Air­port land­ed in the Hud­son Riv­er five min­utes lat­er, where it remains most­ly sub­merged. Fer­ries and oth­er boats con­verged to help with a res­cue effort, as the plane drift­ed south. There was no imme­di­ate infor­ma­tion about the 151 peo­ple on board.

Accord­ing to Chan­nel 4 tele­vi­sion news, the plane, USAir­ways flight 1549, took off from LaGuardia Air­port at 3:26 p.m. was bound for Char­lotte, N.C. and had 146 pas­sen­gers and 5 crew mem­bers. The plane, accord­ing to the news report, may have hit a flock of birds. The pilot tried to return to the air­port when the plane fell into the Hud­son.

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue
Photo of the rescue, posted by Janis Krums on Twitter/Twitpic.

I watched from the 21st floor of the Times Build­ing, as the plan drift­ed south with the tide. I believe that the res­cue oper­a­tion com­plet­ed before it came into view, and it has since drift­ed out of view.

The plane did not break up on impact; divers, com­muter fer­ries and a lot of emer­gency per­son­nel are assist­ing with res­cue oper­a­tions. Every­one is report­ed to have sur­vived the crash and res­cue, as of this moment, but there are injuries. CNN is cur­rent­ly inter­view­ing pas­sen­gers, live on-air.

UPDATE: I don’t know how the Graph­ics team put this togeth­er so quick­ly and so ele­gant­ly, but NYTimes.com has an inter­ac­tive piece today, that tracks the plane’s path.

Also, CNN has been run­ning a Google Earth ani­ma­tion of the flight, which is less pret­ty, but kind of cool.

Obamicon.Me

Make your own Obam­i­con:

Your image in a style inspired by Shep­ard Fairey’s icon­ic poster. Regard­less of your can­di­date of choice in the 2008 elec­tion, here’s your chance to sound-off.

From the folks at Paste, via Sean.

NY Magazine on Innovation at the Times

Renegades
Aron Pilhofer, Andrew DeVigal, Steve Duenes, Matthew Ericson, and Gabriel Dance.
Photo courtesy NY Mag / Mike McGregor
Election Day Word Train »
Faces of the Dead »
Pogue-o-matic »

Sure there’s been a lot of recent bad news about the New York Times Com­pa­ny, and news­pa­pers coast-to-coast are pulling back cov­er­age, fil­ing for bank­rupt­cy and clos­ing. But there is also anoth­er sto­ry to tell.

New York Mag­a­zine has a piece in this week’s issue on the Times Mul­ti­me­dia, Graph­ics, Inter­ac­tive Tech and R&D groups, titled The New Jour­nal­ism: Goos­ing the Gray Lady. It details some of the orga­ni­za­tion­al steps tak­en by the Times, in order to posi­tion itself for the day when the online prod­uct eclipses the print edi­tion in reach, rev­enue and rel­e­vance.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘NY Mag­a­zine on Inno­va­tion at the Times’

Design Loves a Depression

Vermelha Chair

This past week­end, The New York Times Week in Review argues in a sto­ry head­lined Design Loves a Depres­sion that the recent eco­nom­ic slow­down will force design­ers to eschew nov­el­ty and the imprac­ti­cal, and focus more on the “intel­li­gent rework­ing of cur­rent con­di­tions”:

Design tends to thrive in hard times. In the scarci­ty of the 1940s, Charles and Ray Eames pro­duced fur­ni­ture and oth­er prod­ucts of endur­ing appeal from cheap mate­ri­als like plas­tic, resin and ply­wood, and Ital­ian design flow­ered in the after­math of World War II.

Will today’s design­ers rise to the occa­sion? “What design­ers do real­ly well is work with­in con­straints, work with what they have,” said Pao­la Antonel­li, senior cura­tor of archi­tec­ture and design at the Muse­um of Mod­ern Art. “This might be the time when design­ers can real­ly do their job, and do it in a human­is­tic spir­it.”

Relat­ed: Design­ing Through the Reces­sion, by design­er Michael Bierut

UPDATE: Mur­ray Moss takes the WIR to task in a piece today on Design Observ­er:

Design loves a depres­sion? I can assure you that design, along with paint­ing, sculp­ture, pho­tog­ra­phy, music, dance, fash­ion, the culi­nary arts, archi­tec­ture, and the­atre, loves a depres­sion no more than it loves a war, a flood, or a plague. Michael Cannell’s arti­cle is regres­sive and mean-spir­it­ed, and it demands a response.

…quite a pro­vok­ing dis­cus­sion.

Image courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

New Year’s Eve in the Berkshires

Reverse

Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, in North Adams, Massachusetts.

Things have been qui­et around here over the hol­i­days. I turned 31 years old on Decem­ber 22, and then Lisa and I spent some time in Buf­fa­lo with our folks, where I got to see my newest baby cousin Aline.

North Adams
The MASS MoCA campus was once the Sampson Shoe Company.
Sol LeWitt: A Wall Drawing Retrospective »
Anselm Kiefer: Sculpture and Paintings »

Then, after a few days back in Brook­lyn, we head­ed up to the Berk­shires for New Year’s Eve in North Adams – it’s not the most excit­ing town to ring in the new year, but we vis­it­ed MASS MoCA, stayed in a won­der­ful hotel called The Porch­es, and had the best meal North Adams has to offer at the Gramer­cy Bistro.

I didn’t do a lot of reflect­ing and res­o­lu­tion-mak­ing, but I am thank­ful for my fam­i­ly and friends, and for how great 2008 was for Lisa and I. Lisa is fond of say­ing that each year has been bet­ter than the last, which is more than one can hope for in this world.

More pho­tos below the jump.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘New Year’s Eve in the Berk­shires’