Archive for the 'photos' Category

European Vacation ’09

…or, what I’ve been up to this sum­mer…

I’ve been neglect­ing the blog late­ly, though I am ten­ta­tive­ly sketch­ing out big plans for its future… some day, (prob­a­bly in the fall), I’ll get back to this.

But, in way of an update, Lisa final­ly post­ed all of her pho­tos from our lit­tle Euro­pean adven­ture a cou­ple of weeks ago, see below. 10 days with Jason and Cristen in Paris, Ams­ter­dam, the Rhineland, Bavaria and Berlin.

Berlin is an amaz­ing­ly weird place — I feel like we only scratched the sur­face, I must go back.

My iPhone-only pho­tos are on flickr »

Ghost in the Machine: The Clash

Ghost in the Machine: The Clash

London Calling, cassette tape on canvas, 2009 — By Erika Iris Simmons

Two things that I real­ly love about this illus­tra­tion by Eri­ka Iris Sim­mons:

  1. It’s the icon­ic image from the cov­er of The Clash’s mas­ter­piece Lon­don Call­ing.
  2. It’s ren­dered with casette tape!

View it at the largest size to see the detail.

Camera Obscura & DJ Victoria Bergsman, at the Bell House

Victoria Bergsman
Victoria Bergsman, DJing at The Bell House in Brooklyn.

Ned­ward: Vic­to­ria Bergs­man (for­mer­ly of The Con­cretes) is DJing at The Bell House, much to my delight. Wait­ing for Cam­era Obscu­ra!

As big a fan of Cam­era Obscu­ra as I am, the more inter­est­ing bit Tues­day night was a spe­cial guest DJ, Vic­to­ria Bergs­man. A lot of peo­ple know her voice as the female coun­ter­point in Young Folks, the Peter Bjorn and John sing-along hit from a cou­ple of years ago. But she was also the singer in one of my favorite bands, The Con­cretes. (Cam­era Obscu­ra fans should check out their epony­mous debut album.) She has since left the band, and formed a solo project under the name Tak­en By Trees, (also a great debut).

Any­how, I might have been the only per­son in the crowd that had any idea who she was – or cared – so Lisa encour­aged me to say hel­lo. But, I’m just not one of those peo­ple who walks up to a famous per­son, and just gush­es in their face. Call it shy­ness, call it fear of dis­ap­point­ment… the bot­tom line is that I chick­ened out.

To make mat­ters worse, Lisa went over to the DJ booth with­out me, and told Ms. Bergs­man that “her friend was a big fan,” but that he “didn’t want to both­er her.” Nice. So now I’m shy, and embar­rassed.

I don’t real­ly regret it that much, but I would’ve liked to show off some dance moves from The Con­cretes’ On The Radio video. I’d like to think that she would’ve laughed.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Cam­era Obscu­ra & DJ Vic­to­ria Bergs­man, at the Bell House’

U.S. Airways Jet Crashes Into Hudson River

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue

My photo from the 21st floor of the New York Times Building, in midtown.

From City Room:

A USAir­ways plane that took off at 3:26 p.m. from La Guardia Air­port land­ed in the Hud­son Riv­er five min­utes lat­er, where it remains most­ly sub­merged. Fer­ries and oth­er boats con­verged to help with a res­cue effort, as the plane drift­ed south. There was no imme­di­ate infor­ma­tion about the 151 peo­ple on board.

Accord­ing to Chan­nel 4 tele­vi­sion news, the plane, USAir­ways flight 1549, took off from LaGuardia Air­port at 3:26 p.m. was bound for Char­lotte, N.C. and had 146 pas­sen­gers and 5 crew mem­bers. The plane, accord­ing to the news report, may have hit a flock of birds. The pilot tried to return to the air­port when the plane fell into the Hud­son.

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue
Photo of the rescue, posted by Janis Krums on Twitter/Twitpic.

I watched from the 21st floor of the Times Build­ing, as the plan drift­ed south with the tide. I believe that the res­cue oper­a­tion com­plet­ed before it came into view, and it has since drift­ed out of view.

The plane did not break up on impact; divers, com­muter fer­ries and a lot of emer­gency per­son­nel are assist­ing with res­cue oper­a­tions. Every­one is report­ed to have sur­vived the crash and res­cue, as of this moment, but there are injuries. CNN is cur­rent­ly inter­view­ing pas­sen­gers, live on-air.

UPDATE: I don’t know how the Graph­ics team put this togeth­er so quick­ly and so ele­gant­ly, but NYTimes.com has an inter­ac­tive piece today, that tracks the plane’s path.

Also, CNN has been run­ning a Google Earth ani­ma­tion of the flight, which is less pret­ty, but kind of cool.

Obamicon.Me

Make your own Obam­i­con:

Your image in a style inspired by Shep­ard Fairey’s icon­ic poster. Regard­less of your can­di­date of choice in the 2008 elec­tion, here’s your chance to sound-off.

From the folks at Paste, via Sean.

NY Magazine on Innovation at the Times

Renegades
Aron Pilhofer, Andrew DeVigal, Steve Duenes, Matthew Ericson, and Gabriel Dance.
Photo courtesy NY Mag / Mike McGregor
Election Day Word Train »
Faces of the Dead »
Pogue-o-matic »

Sure there’s been a lot of recent bad news about the New York Times Com­pa­ny, and news­pa­pers coast-to-coast are pulling back cov­er­age, fil­ing for bank­rupt­cy and clos­ing. But there is also anoth­er sto­ry to tell.

New York Mag­a­zine has a piece in this week’s issue on the Times Mul­ti­me­dia, Graph­ics, Inter­ac­tive Tech and R&D groups, titled The New Jour­nal­ism: Goos­ing the Gray Lady. It details some of the orga­ni­za­tion­al steps tak­en by the Times, in order to posi­tion itself for the day when the online prod­uct eclipses the print edi­tion in reach, rev­enue and rel­e­vance.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘NY Mag­a­zine on Inno­va­tion at the Times’

Love Is All @ The Bowery Ballroom

light

Love Is All performing at the Bowery Ballroom, in Manhattan.

It was not as leg­endary as their first show at the Knit­ting Fac­to­ry, or the sweat-dripped set at Mar­ket Hotel in Bush­wick this past sum­mer, but Love Is All still knows how to bring it. They played a mix of songs from the new album A Hun­dred Things Keep Me Up At Night as well as from their debut, and even mixed in their Flock of Seag­ulls cov­er.

UPDATE: My Pho­tos on Flickr » | NYCTaper’s Audio From the Show

Saving Buffalo’s Untold Beauty

Downtown Buffalo

Photo Credit: Tony Cenicola/The New York TimesA photo of downtown Buffalo.

The Times had a great piece yes­ter­day on Buffalo’s archi­tec­tur­al lega­cy, and recent attempts to save his­toric build­ings:

Buf­fa­lo is home to some of the great­est Amer­i­can archi­tec­ture of the late 19th and ear­ly 20th cen­turies, with major archi­tects like Hen­ry Hob­son Richard­son, Fred­er­ick Law Olm­st­ed, Louis Sul­li­van and Frank Lloyd Wright build­ing mar­vels here. Togeth­er they shaped one of the grand­est ear­ly visions of the demo­c­ra­t­ic Amer­i­can city.

Yet Buf­fa­lo is more com­mon­ly iden­ti­fied with the crum­bling infra­struc­ture, aban­doned homes and dwin­dling jobs that have defined the Rust Belt for the past 50 years. And for decades its archi­tec­ture has seemed strange­ly frozen in time.

There is also an accom­pa­ny­ing slide show, from which the pho­to above was tak­en.

Full dis­clo­sure: I’m orig­i­nal­ly from Buf­fa­lo.

Who Said Print is Dead?

OBAMA
Today’s edition of the New York Times.

I count myself lucky today, for scor­ing a copy of the paper before they ran out. Appar­ent­ly, the sit­u­a­tion is the same through­out the city, (though I’ve heard rumors of anoth­er 50,000 copy run).

In fact, there are a hun­dred or so peo­ple stand­ing on line out­side the Times head­quar­ters, wait­ing for a fresh deliv­ery of news, print­ed on dead trees.

Print Isn’t Dead

A hundred or so people, waiting on line for today’s paper, in front of the Times headquarters in midtown.

From Gawk­er:

Every­body wants a sou­venir of Obama’s vic­to­ry, and you know what makes a great sou­venir? That’s right, a news­pa­per. This is a pho­to of a line out­side the NYT build­ing on 40th Street of peo­ple waiting—for a news­pa­per!

I hope that peo­ple still come to the Times for more than just a sou­venir.

New York Times Anthrax Scare

Who?

Equipment and officials from some government agency that I’ve never heard of, in the lobby of the New York Times Building in midtown.

The lob­by of The New York Times Build­ing, where I work, was closed this past Wednes­day, after an employ­ee on the 13th floor opened an enve­lope that con­tained a pow­dery sub­stance. (The 13th floor is where the edi­to­r­i­al board and some colum­nists have offices.)

It turned out to be a hoax, but for sev­er­al hours the build­ing was in near lock-down mode. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, I decid­ed to dis­re­gard warn­ings and went out to meet Lisa for lunch. When I returned, I was locked out for almost an hour, as the police had roped off the building’s entrances. Peer­ing through the win­dows on the 8th Avenue side of the build­ing, I saw a huge cur­tain stretched across one of the ele­va­tor banks. Some fire­men went in with a stretch­er, and the broad­cast news media start­ed con­verg­ing on the street. (Apolo­gies to the very friend­ly NY1 cam­er­a­woman, for refus­ing to talk to her on cam­era.)

All I could do was to take some pho­tos, and wait to be let in. After about an hour, I received word from a col­league inside that they were let­ting employ­ees back in through the freight ele­va­tors in the load­ing dock down 40th st. That was about all the fun I could han­dle for one day… back to work.

More Pho­tos below the jump.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘New York Times Anthrax Scare’

Ready for David Pogue

Shadows
Me, standing in, as lighting is set for a David Pogue shoot.

Today, myself and a few col­leagues helped Zach Wise set up and shoot some green screen video of New York Times Tech­nol­o­gy Colum­nist and near-Broad­way per­former David Pogue. The video will be inte­grat­ed into a mul­ti­me­dia piece that Zach and I are work­ing on, which should be done before Thanks­giv­ing.

This is the first real video shoot that I’ve worked on, (hav­ing in the past done a lot of voice-over work with sound engi­neers). What’s scary is that we did this large­ly by our­selves – Zach found a stu­dio at the near­by CUNY Grad­u­ate School of Jour­nal­ism, we hung the green fab­ric, and we set up the light­ing with a lit­tle help from their engi­neer.

David Pogue came in a short while lat­er, I grabbed a boom mic, and we were off to the races. It was a lot of fun, and Pogue nailed the takes – I have no idea how he did it with­out a teleprompter, but he had us all laugh­ing sev­er­al times. And he was very patient and friend­ly through­out the shoot, even when we had to embar­rass­ing­ly scram­ble back to the office for more P2 cards.

So, that was the hard part – now we have to design and build this thing.

Sacha Baron Cohen Crashes the Catwalk at Milan Fashion Week

Ali G and Borat might have been put to rest, but come­di­an Sacha Baron Cohen seems to now be work­ing on a Brüno movie, based on his gay Aus­tri­an mod­el char­ac­ter.

Ear­li­er today, he caused a ruckus when he crashed the cat­walk at Milan Fash­ion Week, dressed in a ridicu­lous­ly fun­ny cos­tume. The pho­tos and video look hilar­i­ous.

Memorial, 7 years

Memorial

Twin beams of the Tribute in Light in lower Manhattan, as seen from the Promenade in Brooklyn Heights.

Embeddable Flickr Slideshows, and the DNC Convention Stage

The Democrats are going “game show” in Denver.

Flickr revamped their slideshow fea­ture, and the results are stun­ning. The full-screen mode is espe­cial­ly nice, and videos are now inte­grat­ed:

One of the main improve­ments we’ve made is that you can watch videos as they appear in a slideshow. When we come to a video in a slideshow, we’ll play it before we move on to the next item.

The slideshow above is from the Demo­c­ra­t­ic Nation­al Com­mit­tee, show­ing what the stage will look like at for the party’s con­ven­tion in Den­ver, which starts Mon­day. It’s just about the cheesi­est Deal or No Deal thing I’ve ever seen, but per­haps it will play well on TV. (The Cau­cus has a pho­to of the Repub­li­cans’ stage, as well.)

Or, if kit­ties are more your speed, here is a gallery of our cats Katya and Mouse…

Yearbook Yourself

Yearbook Yourself

Upload a photo of yourself, and they’ll take it from there – 1970, 1976, and 1986 respectively.

I had a lot of fun play­ing with Year­book Your­self, a site that will take your bor­ing head­shot and turn it into embar­rass­ing year­book pho­tos that nev­er were.

The tru­ly amaz­ing thing is that the 1970 com­pos­ite (left) is a dead-ringer for my Dad around that time. This is what my mom kind of looked like in the ear­ly 60s.

Lucy

Lucy at Happy Hour (with a bone)

Lucy chomping on a bone at Abilene, during Happy Hour.

We’re dogsit­ting for Liz this week­end, and it’s been a blast.

While I def­i­nite­ly pre­fer the inde­pen­dence of cats in gen­er­al, I’ve real­ly enjoyed spend­ing time with Lucy – she’s a real­ly good dog.

Carroll Will Never Be The Same

Carroll will never be the same

Barriers erected outside the Carroll Street MTA entrance at 2nd Place and Smith Street, in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn.

Looks like the 360 Smith lux­u­ry con­do devel­op­ment is going to shut down my sub­way entrance, and severe­ly mess up the nice plaza in front:

Because the safe­ty of our cus­tomers is of utmost con­cern, this clo­sure will be in effect on a 24-hour, 7 days per week basis for 6–8 months (sub­ject to the progress of the con­struc­tion project)…

See outside.in for more his­to­ry of this con­tro­ver­sial devel­op­ment.

A 3rd Climber

Peel

Workmen remove a flyer left behind by David Malone, who climbed the New York Times Building several hours before.

For the third time in five weeks, some­one has scaled the out­side of The New York Times Head­quar­ters. This time, how­ev­er, it was over and done before most of us got out of bed:

Unlike the two pre­vi­ous climbers, this one — iden­ti­fied lat­er as David Mal­one, a 29-year-old activist from West Hart­ford, Conn., who stud­ies Al Qae­da — did not attempt to make his way to the roof. Instead, he unfurled a ban­ner around the fifth floor of the 52-sto­ry build­ing, before climb­ing a few more sto­ries.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘A 3rd Climber’

Business Week profile of Deborah Kenny

In the cur­rent Busi­ness Week, there is an inter­est­ing pro­file of Deb­o­rah Ken­ny, the founder Harlem Vil­lage Acad­e­mies:

Ken­ny has applied a busi­ness man­age­ment style to run­ning her schools, focus­ing on attract­ing smart teach­ers, nur­tur­ing tal­ent, using reams of data to improve per­for­mance, and putting a huge empha­sis on reward­ing results.

Ken­ny also hap­pens to be Lisa’s boss.

The Big Picture

NYTimes.com isn’t the only NYT prop­er­ty that’s doing inter­est­ing things with blogs these days – Boston.com launched a dif­fer­ent kind of pho­to blog ear­li­er this month, The Big Pic­ture. With its over­sized pho­tos, min­i­mal ads, and hard­ly a pro­mo to oth­er site con­tent, the pre­sen­ta­tion is clear and strik­ing – and praise is pour­ing in.

California Fires

Firefighters work to contain the Humboldt fire which started Wednesday, had grown to 19,000 acres and threatened more than 5,000 structures. (AP Photo/Jason Halley — Chico Enterprise-Record)

Anoth­er inter­est­ing facet about the blog is that it not writ­ten by a Globe pho­tog­ra­ph­er or pho­to edi­tor, but by one of their web­site devel­op­ers. Andy Baio post­ed a great inter­view with the blog’s cre­ator and author, Alan Tay­lor, where he dis­cuss­es his inspi­ra­tion, method­ol­o­gy, and what it’s like being a web devel­op­er work­ing in a journalist’s world. When asked why more news­pa­per sites haven’t done this before, he replied:

Even some of my favorite pho­to sites are often lim­it­ed to ‘Pho­to of the Day’ or ‘24 Hours in Pic­tures’ fea­tures. That’s inter­est­ing, and you can find some mind-blow­ing images there, but I always felt like it lacked con­text, depth, sto­ry.”

Iowa Floods

Brandon Smith carries his two cats, Fry and Bender, to dry land from their flooded and evacuated home on June 12, 2008 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Photo by David Greedy/Getty Images)

As we move to an age where motion graph­ics and video reg­u­lar­ly enhance our tra­di­tion­al news pre­sen­ta­tion, it’s inter­est­ing to take a step back and con­sid­er the pow­er still pho­tog­ra­phy has to tell a sto­ry. And work­ing online with­out the space con­straint of print, news orga­ni­za­tions have an oppor­tu­ni­ty to bring more depth and con­text to read­ers, through excel­lent pho­to­jour­nal­ism.

Alain Robert, climbing the New York Times Building

Nev­er a dull moment here at the Times… Today, we wit­nessed Alain Robert climb the New York Times Build­ing on 8th Avenue fac­ing 41st street. I took this with my iPhone on the 21st floor:

Alain Robert

He scaled up the ceram­ic rods that are affixed to the out­side of the build­ing, attract­ing hun­dreds of onlook­ers inside the build­ing, as well as down the street.

City Room has more about Alain and this stunt, includ­ing the news that he was arrest­ed by NYPD after reach­ing the roof – 52 floors up from the street.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Alain Robert, climb­ing the New York Times Build­ing’

Farewell Sean & Louise

IMG_2875.JPG

Cupcakes! – Photo by Villafranca.

This week, the nytimes.com Design group says farewell to two real­ly tal­ent­ed col­leagues – Sean Vil­lafran­ca and Louise Ma. Sean is leav­ing to become Design Direc­tor at time.com, and Louise is going to free­lance, full-time.

I’m still new around these parts, but Sean and Louise made me feel at home. We’re going to miss you guys! (But, we are hir­ing…)

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Farewell Sean & Louise’

Volvo

Volvo

Volvo, somewhere in Williamsburg between Berry and Wythe.

Lisa and I spent a good chunk of the week­end fur­ni­ture shop­ping, and spring clean­ing. On Sat­ur­day, we ven­tured deep into Con­necti­cut to go to an estate sale, in pur­suit of what turned out to be an Amer­i­can-made Dan­ish “style” din­ing set, which was just too big and ugly to buy. From there, we drove over to Bea­con, NY, which has a cou­ple of nice stores with mid-cen­tu­ry fur­ni­ture, (Anna found some amaz­ing stuff there). We had some cof­fee (pho­to below the fold), but left emp­ty-hand­ed.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Vol­vo’

Bye Bye, Soupy

It’s tough being a small-mar­ket sports fan, espe­cial­ly when the sport in ques­tion is hock­ey. For all the talk of par­i­ty in the NHL, it’s clear that there are two class­es of teams – those will­ing to spend mon­ey to acquire and retain top tal­ent, and the Buf­fa­lo Sabres.

The Sabres suf­fered los­ing their two top cen­ter­men to free agency last off-sea­son, after post­ing the best record in the NHL and their sec­ond East­ern Con­fer­ence Cham­pi­onship loss in a row. One can argue about front office mis­takes in not sign­ing Briere and Drury, but in the end, it was their turn to cash in on a big con­tract, and Buf­fa­lo was unwill­ing or could not afford to pay. (Let us not for­get also that the Sabres were up against the salary cap all of last sea­son.)

bye bye, Soupy.And now we have a home-grown NHL super­star in Bri­an Camp­bell – two-time All Star, spin-o-rama skater, and open-ice hit­ter of R.J. Umberg­er – now due his big pay day at the end of this sea­son, as he becomes eli­gi­ble for free agency. What are the Sabres to do?

Well, the only move is to trade him. The Sabres could not risk los­ing him for noth­ing, and Camp­bell and his agent seemed luke warm about sign­ing some­thing before the trade dead­line. I cer­tain­ly can’t blame either par­ty.

But, I can feel sad. Being a fan of a small-mar­ket team is tough, and I’d be lying if I weren’t a lit­tle jeal­ous that the Rangers or Ducks can just go buy whomev­er they want every year. In Buf­fa­lo, we have to make our own stars.

After the jump, some high­lights from Soupy’s career in Buf­fa­lo, includ­ing some of his hilar­i­ous­ly hor­ri­ble local tele­vi­sion com­mer­cials.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Bye Bye, Soupy’

Lunar Eclipse

Lunar Eclipse II

Tonight there was a Lunar Eclipse, the last one ’til 2010. Check out shadowandsubstance.com for more infor­ma­tion, or see if oth­ers have bet­ter pho­tos on Flickr.

Tak­en on 4th Place in Car­roll Gar­dens, with my trusty (and shaky) SD750.

UPDATE: Lisa has a nice shot, from her D50.