When I Grow Up” Video by Fever Ray

When I Grow Up video from Karin Dreijer Andersson’s solo project, Fever Ray.
Karin Dreijer Andersson
Publicity shot of Karin Dreijer Andersson.

Karin Drei­jer Ander­s­son has a solo album out now, under the name Fever Ray. She is one-half of the sib­ling pair that is The Knife, and the solo album is very much a con­tin­u­a­tion of their moody work on Silent Shout.

This is the sec­ond Fever Ray video, and it’s a nice com­pli­ment to the gothy/creepy visu­als in the first video, If I Had a Heart, which was direct­ed by fre­quent Knife col­lab­o­ra­tor Andreas Nils­son. (See the video for Silent Shout, and his visu­als for their last tour.)

And no, that’s not Karin in the video – she hasn’t appeared reg­u­lar­ly in her videos since her days in the Swedish indie band Hon­ey is Cool, in the 90s. (A few notable excep­tions include You Take My Breath Away, a chip­per duet with for­mer First Floor Pow­er front-woman Jen­ny Wil­son, and her guest vocals on Röyksopp’s club hit What Else is There? No, she’s not the float­ing chick, but the one sit­ting at the table, mid-way through.)

Speak­ing of that Röyk­sopp song, this video is direct­ed by the same direc­tor, Mar­tin de Thu­rah, a Dan­ish film­mak­er that seems to have a thing for effects and screw­ing around with the laws of physics – beau­ti­ful work.

I warmed to the album almost instant­ly, but see­ing the songs come to life in these videos, they’ve start­ed to take on a cin­e­mat­ic qual­i­ty inside my head. Like all of Karin’s work, some peo­ple might be turned off by her singing style or be too quick to dis­miss her as Björk-lite. I like this album, and I like it more and more after each lis­ten.

Pur­chase & Down­load Fever Ray »

Inter­view mag­a­zine inter­view with Karin »

The Crash of Flight 3407

Flight 3407 – Reuters
CREDIT: Gary Wiepert, Reuters [via]

Last night, Con­ti­nen­tal Flight 3407 crashed in route from Newark to Buf­fa­lo Nia­gara Inter­na­tion­al Air­port, just a few miles from its sched­uled des­ti­na­tion. The crash site is just five or six miles from where I grew up, in a sub­urb of Buf­fa­lo, NY.

The Buf­fa­lo News has a liv­ing top­ic page ded­i­cat­ed to cov­er­age of the event, which they are updat­ing with arti­cles, pho­tos, video and oth­er resources, as they are put up. They also start­ed live blog­ging the sto­ry, and link­ing to out­side resources pro­vid­ed by cit­i­zen jour­nal­ists.

CNN is car­ry­ing live video from the local NBC affli­ate.

My heart goes out to the vic­tims, their fam­i­lies and the near­by com­mu­ni­ties. It’s impor­tant to remem­ber that these things rarely hap­pen, but when they do, espe­cial­ly so close to home, it’s impos­si­ble not to feel sad.

Michael Bierut on the Move from the “Drawing Board to the Desktop”

From Michael Bierut’s piece in the Times this week­end, Draw­ing Board to the Desk­top: A Designer’s Path:

All of us assumed that these machines [com­put­ers] were just fan­cy hybrids of type­writ­ers and cal­cu­la­tors. We did all the art­work with rub­ber cement, col­ored paper and paint. We had no idea, but we were look­ing at the begin­ning of the end, and the end came quick­ly.

Michael is a part­ner at Pen­ta­gram, and blogs reg­u­lar­ly at Design Observ­er.

The Weekender

This is a pret­ty good par­o­dy of the New York Times Week­ender com­mer­cials, that play on basic cable sta­tions through­out the Tri-State area and New Eng­land. Appear­ances by Paul Rudd, Eugene Mir­man, and The State/Stel­la alum­ni Michael Ian Black, Michael Showal­ter and David Wain. It makes me want to go see some com­e­dy at 92YTribeca.

Also, I must find some­thing besides the Times to blog about.

[via NYMag]

A New Whitehouse.gov, and New Typefaces

As of noon today, we have a new pres­i­dent, as well as a new WhiteHouse.gov. The much-admired, Gotham-based typo­graph­i­cal iden­ti­ty is gone, but as Jason San­ta Maria points out, the design­ers went instead with two oth­er type­faces from the same foundry: Whit­ney and Hoe­fler Text.

Anoth­er major redesign this week also involved the use of Whit­ney: kottke.org – though you’ll need to have the font installed on your machine in order to see it.

Which begs the ques­tion, Is Whit­ney the new Gotham? (Seems like just yes­ter­day we were ask­ing, Is Gotham the New Inter­state?)

Hoefler+Frere-Jones is on a roll.

U.S. Airways Jet Crashes Into Hudson River

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue

My photo from the 21st floor of the New York Times Building, in midtown.

From City Room:

A USAir­ways plane that took off at 3:26 p.m. from La Guardia Air­port land­ed in the Hud­son Riv­er five min­utes lat­er, where it remains most­ly sub­merged. Fer­ries and oth­er boats con­verged to help with a res­cue effort, as the plane drift­ed south. There was no imme­di­ate infor­ma­tion about the 151 peo­ple on board.

Accord­ing to Chan­nel 4 tele­vi­sion news, the plane, USAir­ways flight 1549, took off from LaGuardia Air­port at 3:26 p.m. was bound for Char­lotte, N.C. and had 146 pas­sen­gers and 5 crew mem­bers. The plane, accord­ing to the news report, may have hit a flock of birds. The pilot tried to return to the air­port when the plane fell into the Hud­son.

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue
Photo of the rescue, posted by Janis Krums on Twitter/Twitpic.

I watched from the 21st floor of the Times Build­ing, as the plan drift­ed south with the tide. I believe that the res­cue oper­a­tion com­plet­ed before it came into view, and it has since drift­ed out of view.

The plane did not break up on impact; divers, com­muter fer­ries and a lot of emer­gency per­son­nel are assist­ing with res­cue oper­a­tions. Every­one is report­ed to have sur­vived the crash and res­cue, as of this moment, but there are injuries. CNN is cur­rent­ly inter­view­ing pas­sen­gers, live on-air.

UPDATE: I don’t know how the Graph­ics team put this togeth­er so quick­ly and so ele­gant­ly, but NYTimes.com has an inter­ac­tive piece today, that tracks the plane’s path.

Also, CNN has been run­ning a Google Earth ani­ma­tion of the flight, which is less pret­ty, but kind of cool.

Obamicon.Me

Make your own Obam­i­con:

Your image in a style inspired by Shep­ard Fairey’s icon­ic poster. Regard­less of your can­di­date of choice in the 2008 elec­tion, here’s your chance to sound-off.

From the folks at Paste, via Sean.

NY Magazine on Innovation at the Times

Renegades
Aron Pilhofer, Andrew DeVigal, Steve Duenes, Matthew Ericson, and Gabriel Dance.
Photo courtesy NY Mag / Mike McGregor
Election Day Word Train »
Faces of the Dead »
Pogue-o-matic »

Sure there’s been a lot of recent bad news about the New York Times Com­pa­ny, and news­pa­pers coast-to-coast are pulling back cov­er­age, fil­ing for bank­rupt­cy and clos­ing. But there is also anoth­er sto­ry to tell.

New York Mag­a­zine has a piece in this week’s issue on the Times Mul­ti­me­dia, Graph­ics, Inter­ac­tive Tech and R&D groups, titled The New Jour­nal­ism: Goos­ing the Gray Lady. It details some of the orga­ni­za­tion­al steps tak­en by the Times, in order to posi­tion itself for the day when the online prod­uct eclipses the print edi­tion in reach, rev­enue and rel­e­vance.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘NY Mag­a­zine on Inno­va­tion at the Times’

Design Loves a Depression

Vermelha Chair

This past week­end, The New York Times Week in Review argues in a sto­ry head­lined Design Loves a Depres­sion that the recent eco­nom­ic slow­down will force design­ers to eschew nov­el­ty and the imprac­ti­cal, and focus more on the “intel­li­gent rework­ing of cur­rent con­di­tions”:

Design tends to thrive in hard times. In the scarci­ty of the 1940s, Charles and Ray Eames pro­duced fur­ni­ture and oth­er prod­ucts of endur­ing appeal from cheap mate­ri­als like plas­tic, resin and ply­wood, and Ital­ian design flow­ered in the after­math of World War II.

Will today’s design­ers rise to the occa­sion? “What design­ers do real­ly well is work with­in con­straints, work with what they have,” said Pao­la Antonel­li, senior cura­tor of archi­tec­ture and design at the Muse­um of Mod­ern Art. “This might be the time when design­ers can real­ly do their job, and do it in a human­is­tic spir­it.”

Relat­ed: Design­ing Through the Reces­sion, by design­er Michael Bierut

UPDATE: Mur­ray Moss takes the WIR to task in a piece today on Design Observ­er:

Design loves a depres­sion? I can assure you that design, along with paint­ing, sculp­ture, pho­tog­ra­phy, music, dance, fash­ion, the culi­nary arts, archi­tec­ture, and the­atre, loves a depres­sion no more than it loves a war, a flood, or a plague. Michael Cannell’s arti­cle is regres­sive and mean-spir­it­ed, and it demands a response.

…quite a pro­vok­ing dis­cus­sion.

Image courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

New Year’s Eve in the Berkshires

Reverse

Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, in North Adams, Massachusetts.

Things have been qui­et around here over the hol­i­days. I turned 31 years old on Decem­ber 22, and then Lisa and I spent some time in Buf­fa­lo with our folks, where I got to see my newest baby cousin Aline.

North Adams
The MASS MoCA campus was once the Sampson Shoe Company.
Sol LeWitt: A Wall Drawing Retrospective »
Anselm Kiefer: Sculpture and Paintings »

Then, after a few days back in Brook­lyn, we head­ed up to the Berk­shires for New Year’s Eve in North Adams – it’s not the most excit­ing town to ring in the new year, but we vis­it­ed MASS MoCA, stayed in a won­der­ful hotel called The Porch­es, and had the best meal North Adams has to offer at the Gramer­cy Bistro.

I didn’t do a lot of reflect­ing and res­o­lu­tion-mak­ing, but I am thank­ful for my fam­i­ly and friends, and for how great 2008 was for Lisa and I. Lisa is fond of say­ing that each year has been bet­ter than the last, which is more than one can hope for in this world.

More pho­tos below the jump.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘New Year’s Eve in the Berk­shires’

A New Pair of Sox for the Red Sox

New Red Sox Identities

This design link is near and dear to my heart – The Boston Red Sox recent­ly updat­ed their team iden­ti­ty and uni­forms. Over­all, I think it’s a pos­i­tive evo­lu­tion, though seems a bit nos­tol­gic. I love the gray pri­ma­ry road jer­seys.

Armin Vit most­ly likes what he sees:

Replac­ing the old seal as the team’s offi­cial logo is the lone pair of red, hang­ing sox. Unless I’m wrong, there is no typog­ra­phy asso­ci­at­ed with it. None. No “Boston.” No “Red Sox.” If that’s the case, this is one of the best cas­es of visu­al iden­ti­ty and brand equi­ty becom­ing so strong the icon doesn’t need expla­na­tion. They are sox. They are red. They can not be any­thing oth­er than the Boston Red Sox.

Illustration courtesy of Boston.com

Icon-maker Shepard Fairey — Person of the Year 2008 — TIME

TIME Person of The Year 2008 Cover
Shepard Fairey’s cover for TIME.

Time.com has a nice video inter­view with Shep­ard Fairey, design­er of the HOPE and PROGRESS posters of Barack Oba­ma that were near­ly ubiq­ui­tous dur­ing the ’08 pres­i­den­tial cam­paign. Time Mag­a­zine named the Pres­i­dent-Elect Per­son of the Year 2008, so it seemed only nat­ur­al to hire Fairey to do the cov­er.

In the video, he shows the process used to cre­ate the piece – tech­niques learned from his days as a screen print­er.

Via Sean

Blur to Re-Form for Massive Hyde Park Gig

Blur to Re-Form for Mas­sive Hyde Park Gig »

It end­ed in acri­mo­ny, with the gui­tarist brand­ing the singer an “ego­ma­ni­ac”. But after months of spec­u­la­tion, Blur have con­firmed that they will be reunit­ing for a mas­sive gig in London’s Hyde Park next sum­mer.

My favorite band of the 90s, togeth­er again for the first time since gui­tarist Gra­ham Cox­on quit the band in 2002.

More: Blur In Video » | Review of Gra­ham Cox­on Solo Show in 2005 »

Love Is All @ The Bowery Ballroom

light

Love Is All performing at the Bowery Ballroom, in Manhattan.

It was not as leg­endary as their first show at the Knit­ting Fac­to­ry, or the sweat-dripped set at Mar­ket Hotel in Bush­wick this past sum­mer, but Love Is All still knows how to bring it. They played a mix of songs from the new album A Hun­dred Things Keep Me Up At Night as well as from their debut, and even mixed in their Flock of Seag­ulls cov­er.

UPDATE: My Pho­tos on Flickr » | NYCTaper’s Audio From the Show

Bruce McCall on Letterman

I TiVo most of the late-night talk shows each night, in the hopes that some band or author that I love is fea­tured – some­how, that’s eas­i­er than pre­emp­tive­ly scan­ning TV Guide. But, I was gen­uine­ly sur­prised and thrilled to see the illus­tra­tor and writer Bruce McCall as a guest on David Letterman’s show, the oth­er night.

I’m far too young to know his work from the Nation­al Lam­poon, but McCall’s New York­er cov­ers are ingrained in my mem­o­ry:

Bruce McCall New Yorker Covers

Some of Bruce McCall’s New Yorker covers, from 1995–2008.

Letterman’s show might not have the cul­tur­al rel­e­vance that it once did, but you get the sense by watch­ing the seg­ment that he’d rather be sit­ting there talk­ing to McCall, than Mary-Kate or that chick from Twi­light. It’s just one of the many things that make Dave tick, and why I have a TiVo sea­son pass for the Late Show.

In the clip below, Let­ter­man and McCall look at and dis­cuss some of the work in McCall’s new children’s book, Mar­vel­town.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Bruce McCall on Let­ter­man’

The Mostly True Story of Helvetica and the New York City Subway

The Most­ly True Sto­ry of Hel­veti­ca and the New York City Sub­way:

There is a com­mon­ly held belief that Hel­veti­ca is the sig­nage type­face of the New York City sub­way sys­tem, a belief rein­forced by Hel­veti­ca, Gary Hustwit’s pop­u­lar 2007 doc­u­men­tary about the type­face. But it is not true—or rather, it is only some­what true. Hel­veti­ca is the offi­cial type­face of the MTA today, but it was not the type­face spec­i­fied by Uni­mark Inter­na­tion­al when it cre­at­ed a new sig­nage sys­tem at the end of the 1960s.

r-train
R-train icon, set in Helvetica and Standard.

I noticed this dis­crep­an­cy ear­li­er this year – I had to recre­ate some MTA sub­way icons for use on a project, and noticed that the R train map icon looked noth­ing like the Hel­veti­ca “R”. The MTA’s own web­site seems to be con­fused about the type used in the sys­tem icons, let alone its sta­tion sig­nage.

Enter typog­ra­ph­er Paul Shaw, and his 10,000+ word piece on AIGA’s site. Did you now that Boston’s sub­way sig­nage sys­tem was the first to use Hel­veti­ca, with­out mod­i­fi­ca­tions? Ever curi­ous as to the process by which enam­el signs are made? Want to just look at pret­ty pic­tures of sub­way signs over the years?

It’s a great his­to­ry, for fans of typog­ra­phy and the MTA.

Saving Buffalo’s Untold Beauty

Downtown Buffalo

Photo Credit: Tony Cenicola/The New York TimesA photo of downtown Buffalo.

The Times had a great piece yes­ter­day on Buffalo’s archi­tec­tur­al lega­cy, and recent attempts to save his­toric build­ings:

Buf­fa­lo is home to some of the great­est Amer­i­can archi­tec­ture of the late 19th and ear­ly 20th cen­turies, with major archi­tects like Hen­ry Hob­son Richard­son, Fred­er­ick Law Olm­st­ed, Louis Sul­li­van and Frank Lloyd Wright build­ing mar­vels here. Togeth­er they shaped one of the grand­est ear­ly visions of the demo­c­ra­t­ic Amer­i­can city.

Yet Buf­fa­lo is more com­mon­ly iden­ti­fied with the crum­bling infra­struc­ture, aban­doned homes and dwin­dling jobs that have defined the Rust Belt for the past 50 years. And for decades its archi­tec­ture has seemed strange­ly frozen in time.

There is also an accom­pa­ny­ing slide show, from which the pho­to above was tak­en.

Full dis­clo­sure: I’m orig­i­nal­ly from Buf­fa­lo.

What’s Hebrew for “Yes We Can”?

Well, that didnt’t take long – giv­en the suc­cess of Barack Obama’s dig­i­tal and design strat­e­gy in our recent pres­i­den­tial elec­tion, some­one was bound to, ahem… com­plete­ly rip him off, soon­er or lat­er.

Sur­pris­ing­ly, the most recent exam­ple is the cam­paign of Ben­jamin Netanyahu, the con­ser­v­a­tive Likud leader run­ning for prime min­is­ter of Israel. The Times reports:

The col­ors, the fonts, the icons for donat­ing and vol­un­teer­ing, the use of embed­ded video, and the social net­work­ing Face­book-type options — includ­ing Twit­ter, which hard­ly exists in Israel — all reflect a con­scious effort by the Netanyahu cam­paign to learn from the Oba­ma suc­cess.

I won­der if that type is the Hebrew Gotham?

wp-Hyphenate by KINGdesk

Wp-Hyphen­ate is a very promis­ing plu­g­in for Word­Press, because it enables some typo­graph­i­cal con­trol not pre­vi­ous­ly avail­able for the web:

With it your left aligned text will be less ragged, and your jus­ti­fied text will avoid the ghast­ly word spac­ing that has pre­vented seri­ous web design­ers from using it.

It’s still in its ear­ly stages, but I’m exper­i­ment­ing with it here – using jus­ti­fied para­graphs and block­quotes. Let me know what you think.

Out of the box, the plu­g­in broke my linked flickr image codes, so I had to put <a> tags on the whitelist, so the plu­g­in ignores any linked text. Hope­ful­ly that issue will be addressed in the future.

UPDATE: Nov 16, 2008 – Jeff King has updat­ed his plu­g­in to address the issue described above.

Grant Park — Alex Wright

My col­league at NYTimes.com, Alex Wright, hap­pened to be in Chica­go last night, so he made his way to the Grant Park cel­e­bra­tion. I’m sure that will be a moment to remem­ber for some time.

Newsweek’s ‘Hackers and Spending Sprees’

Newsweek.com has some inter­est­ing tid­bits about the recent­ly com­plet­ed pres­i­den­tial elec­tion between Obama/Biden and McCain/Palin:

  • Palin’s “rogue” shop­ping spree was greater than the ear­li­er report­ed $150,000.
  • Oba­ma didn’t choose Hillary Clin­ton for the VP slot most­ly because of her hus­band.
  • Palin appeared with noth­ing on save for a tow­el, when McCain aides and strate­gists came to her hotel room to brief her at the Repub­li­can Con­ven­tion.
  • Oba­ma thinks some debate ques­tions are stu­pid.

More will be released on Newsweek.com in the com­ing days.

Who Said Print is Dead?

OBAMA
Today’s edition of the New York Times.

I count myself lucky today, for scor­ing a copy of the paper before they ran out. Appar­ent­ly, the sit­u­a­tion is the same through­out the city, (though I’ve heard rumors of anoth­er 50,000 copy run).

In fact, there are a hun­dred or so peo­ple stand­ing on line out­side the Times head­quar­ters, wait­ing for a fresh deliv­ery of news, print­ed on dead trees.

Print Isn’t Dead

A hundred or so people, waiting on line for today’s paper, in front of the Times headquarters in midtown.

From Gawk­er:

Every­body wants a sou­venir of Obama’s vic­to­ry, and you know what makes a great sou­venir? That’s right, a news­pa­per. This is a pho­to of a line out­side the NYT build­ing on 40th Street of peo­ple waiting—for a news­pa­per!

I hope that peo­ple still come to the Times for more than just a sou­venir.

New York Times Anthrax Scare

Who?

Equipment and officials from some government agency that I’ve never heard of, in the lobby of the New York Times Building in midtown.

The lob­by of The New York Times Build­ing, where I work, was closed this past Wednes­day, after an employ­ee on the 13th floor opened an enve­lope that con­tained a pow­dery sub­stance. (The 13th floor is where the edi­to­r­i­al board and some colum­nists have offices.)

It turned out to be a hoax, but for sev­er­al hours the build­ing was in near lock-down mode. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, I decid­ed to dis­re­gard warn­ings and went out to meet Lisa for lunch. When I returned, I was locked out for almost an hour, as the police had roped off the building’s entrances. Peer­ing through the win­dows on the 8th Avenue side of the build­ing, I saw a huge cur­tain stretched across one of the ele­va­tor banks. Some fire­men went in with a stretch­er, and the broad­cast news media start­ed con­verg­ing on the street. (Apolo­gies to the very friend­ly NY1 cam­er­a­woman, for refus­ing to talk to her on cam­era.)

All I could do was to take some pho­tos, and wait to be let in. After about an hour, I received word from a col­league inside that they were let­ting employ­ees back in through the freight ele­va­tors in the load­ing dock down 40th st. That was about all the fun I could han­dle for one day… back to work.

More Pho­tos below the jump.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘New York Times Anthrax Scare’

How Hackers Show it’s Not All Bad News at the New York Times

Apolo­gies that this blog looks a lit­tle New York Times-y late­ly, but I had to share this – O’Reilly’s Andrew Savikas wrote a very inter­est­ing post on some of the inter­est­ing stuff we’re doing:

…there‘s some­thing going on at the Times that prob­a­bly won‘t make it to Sil­i­con Alley Insid­er, much less the main­stream busi­ness press, and it‘s some­thing that‘s start­ing to make me think the Times just might suc­ceed in adapt­ing to the chang­ing rules of the media and pub­lish­ing game…

So what’s the Times doing that’s so impor­tant? They’re hack­ing.

Savikas goes on to list a lot of exam­ples, but the best one that I can pro­vide is the com­ing release of our APIs, which will enable peo­ple on the out­side to play, tin­ker, and mashup NY Times con­tent. There are only a few APIs cur­rent­ly pub­lic, but there will be a flood of releas­es in the com­ing months.

[via Jere­my]

UPDATE: Oh man, a bit after I pub­lished this today, we launched our Visu­al­iza­tion Lab – a part­ner­ship that uses IBM’s Many Eyes tech­nol­o­gy. More Info Here »

What the Hell, Malcolm Gladwell

My friend Julia writes today on Huff­in­g­ton Post – What the Hell, Mal­colm Glad­well. She takes the Tip­ping Point author to task for not includ­ing one woman in his new book Out­liers, which exam­ines high achiev­ers:

But what about Vir­ginia Woolf, Susan Son­tag, Tina Brown, or Indra Nooyi, the CEO of Pep­si­Co?

What about Oprah?

The omis­sion of women in Out­liers says more about the nature of “big think” books than it does about Mr. Glad­well.

I think that lets him off the hook easy, but it’s inter­est­ing to read Julia’s thoughts on the book pub­lish­ing world. She posts reg­u­lar­ly to the Harp­er Stu­dio blog, at 26thstory.com.