When I Grow Up” Video by Fever Ray

When I Grow Up video from Karin Drei­jer Andersson’s solo project, Fever Ray.
Karin Dreijer Andersson

Pub­lic­ity shot of Karin Drei­jer Andersson.

Karin Drei­jer Ander­s­son has a solo album out now, under the name Fever Ray. She is one-half of the sib­ling pair that is The Knife, and the solo album is very much a con­tin­u­a­tion of their moody work on Silent Shout.

This is the sec­ond Fever Ray video, and it’s a nice com­pli­ment to the gothy/creepy visu­als in the first video, If I Had a Heart, which was directed by fre­quent Knife col­lab­o­ra­tor Andreas Nils­son. (See the video for Silent Shout, and his visu­als for their last tour.)

And no, that’s not Karin in the video – she hasn’t appeared reg­u­larly in her videos since her days in the Swedish indie band Honey is Cool, in the 90s. (A few notable excep­tions include You Take My Breath Away, a chip­per duet with for­mer First Floor Power front-woman Jenny Wil­son, and her guest vocals on Röyksopp’s club hit What Else is There? No, she’s not the float­ing chick, but the one sit­ting at the table, mid-way through.)

Speak­ing of that Röyk­sopp song, this video is directed by the same direc­tor, Mar­tin de Thu­rah, a Dan­ish film­maker that seems to have a thing for effects and screw­ing around with the laws of physics – beau­ti­ful work.

I warmed to the album almost instantly, but see­ing the songs come to life in these videos, they’ve started to take on a cin­e­matic qual­ity inside my head. Like all of Karin’s work, some peo­ple might be turned off by her singing style or be too quick to dis­miss her as Björk-lite. I like this album, and I like it more and more after each listen.

Pur­chase & Down­load Fever Ray »

Inter­view mag­a­zine inter­view with Karin »

The Crash of Flight 3407

Flight 3407 – Reuters

CREDIT: Gary Wiepert, Reuters [via]

Last night, Con­ti­nen­tal Flight 3407 crashed in route from Newark to Buf­falo Nia­gara Inter­na­tional Air­port, just a few miles from its sched­uled des­ti­na­tion. The crash site is just five or six miles from where I grew up, in a sub­urb of Buf­falo, NY.

The Buf­falo News has a liv­ing topic page ded­i­cated to cov­er­age of the event, which they are updat­ing with arti­cles, pho­tos, video and other resources, as they are put up. They also started live blog­ging the story, and link­ing to out­side resources pro­vided by cit­i­zen journalists.

CNN is car­ry­ing live video from the local NBC affli­ate.

My heart goes out to the vic­tims, their fam­i­lies and the nearby com­mu­ni­ties. It’s impor­tant to remem­ber that these things rarely hap­pen, but when they do, espe­cially so close to home, it’s impos­si­ble not to feel sad.

Michael Bierut on the Move from the “Drawing Board to the Desktop”

From Michael Bierut’s piece in the Times this week­end, Draw­ing Board to the Desk­top: A Designer’s Path:

All of us assumed that these machines [com­put­ers] were just fancy hybrids of type­writ­ers and cal­cu­la­tors. We did all the art­work with rub­ber cement, col­ored paper and paint. We had no idea, but we were look­ing at the begin­ning of the end, and the end came quickly.

Michael is a part­ner at Pen­ta­gram, and blogs reg­u­larly at Design Observer.

The Weekender

This is a pretty good par­ody of the New York Times Week­ender com­mer­cials, that play on basic cable sta­tions through­out the Tri-State area and New Eng­land. Appear­ances by Paul Rudd, Eugene Mir­man, and The State/Stella alumni Michael Ian Black, Michael Showal­ter and David Wain. It makes me want to go see some com­edy at 92YTribeca.

Also, I must find some­thing besides the Times to blog about.

[via NYMag]

A New Whitehouse.gov, and New Typefaces

As of noon today, we have a new pres­i­dent, as well as a new WhiteHouse.gov. The much-admired, Gotham–based typo­graph­i­cal iden­tity is gone, but as Jason Santa Maria points out, the design­ers went instead with two other type­faces from the same foundry: Whit­ney and Hoe­fler Text.

Another major redesign this week also involved the use of Whit­ney: kottke.org – though you’ll need to have the font installed on your machine in order to see it.

Which begs the ques­tion, Is Whit­ney the new Gotham? (Seems like just yes­ter­day we were ask­ing, Is Gotham the New Inter­state?)

Hoefler+Frere-Jones is on a roll.

U.S. Airways Jet Crashes Into Hudson River

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue

My photo from the 21st floor of the New York Times Build­ing, in midtown.

From City Room:

A USAir­ways plane that took off at 3:26 p.m. from La Guardia Air­port landed in the Hud­son River five min­utes later, where it remains mostly sub­merged. Fer­ries and other boats con­verged to help with a res­cue effort, as the plane drifted south. There was no imme­di­ate infor­ma­tion about the 151 peo­ple on board.

Accord­ing to Chan­nel 4 tele­vi­sion news, the plane, USAir­ways flight 1549, took off from LaGuardia Air­port at 3:26 p.m. was bound for Char­lotte, N.C. and had 146 pas­sen­gers and 5 crew mem­bers. The plane, accord­ing to the news report, may have hit a flock of birds. The pilot tried to return to the air­port when the plane fell into the Hudson.

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue

Photo of the res­cue, posted by Janis Krums on Twitter/Twitpic.

I watched from the 21st floor of the Times Build­ing, as the plan drifted south with the tide. I believe that the res­cue oper­a­tion com­pleted before it came into view, and it has since drifted out of view.

The plane did not break up on impact; divers, com­muter fer­ries and a lot of emer­gency per­son­nel are assist­ing with res­cue oper­a­tions. Every­one is reported to have sur­vived the crash and res­cue, as of this moment, but there are injuries. CNN is cur­rently inter­view­ing pas­sen­gers, live on-air.

UPDATE: I don’t know how the Graph­ics team put this together so quickly and so ele­gantly, but NYTimes.com has an inter­ac­tive piece today, that tracks the plane’s path.

Also, CNN has been run­ning a Google Earth ani­ma­tion of the flight, which is less pretty, but kind of cool.

Obamicon.Me

Make your own Obam­i­con:

Your image in a style inspired by Shep­ard Fairey’s iconic poster. Regard­less of your can­di­date of choice in the 2008 elec­tion, here’s your chance to sound-off.

From the folks at Paste, via Sean.

NY Magazine on Innovation at the Times

Renegades

Aron Pil­hofer, Andrew DeVi­gal, Steve Duenes, Matthew Eric­son, and Gabriel Dance.
Photo cour­tesy NY Mag / Mike McGregor
Elec­tion Day Word Train »
Faces of the Dead »
Pogue-o-matic »

Sure there’s been a lot of recent bad news about the New York Times Com­pany, and news­pa­pers coast-to-coast are pulling back cov­er­age, fil­ing for bank­ruptcy and clos­ing. But there is also another story to tell.

New York Mag­a­zine has a piece in this week’s issue on the Times Mul­ti­me­dia, Graph­ics, Inter­ac­tive Tech and R&D groups, titled The New Jour­nal­ism: Goos­ing the Gray Lady. It details some of the orga­ni­za­tional steps taken by the Times, in order to posi­tion itself for the day when the online prod­uct eclipses the print edi­tion in reach, rev­enue and relevance.

Con­tinue read­ing ‘NY Mag­a­zine on Inno­va­tion at the Times’

Design Loves a Depression

Vermelha Chair

This past week­end, The New York Times Week in Review argues in a story head­lined Design Loves a Depres­sion that the recent eco­nomic slow­down will force design­ers to eschew nov­elty and the imprac­ti­cal, and focus more on the “intel­li­gent rework­ing of cur­rent conditions”:

Design tends to thrive in hard times. In the scarcity of the 1940s, Charles and Ray Eames pro­duced fur­ni­ture and other prod­ucts of endur­ing appeal from cheap mate­ri­als like plas­tic, resin and ply­wood, and Ital­ian design flow­ered in the after­math of World War II.

Will today’s design­ers rise to the occa­sion? “What design­ers do really well is work within con­straints, work with what they have,” said Paola Antonelli, senior cura­tor of archi­tec­ture and design at the Museum of Mod­ern Art. “This might be the time when design­ers can really do their job, and do it in a human­is­tic spirit.”

Related: Design­ing Through the Reces­sion, by designer Michael Bierut

UPDATE: Mur­ray Moss takes the WIR to task in a piece today on Design Observer:

Design loves a depres­sion? I can assure you that design, along with paint­ing, sculp­ture, pho­tog­ra­phy, music, dance, fash­ion, the culi­nary arts, archi­tec­ture, and the­atre, loves a depres­sion no more than it loves a war, a flood, or a plague. Michael Cannell’s arti­cle is regres­sive and mean-spirited, and it demands a response.

…quite a pro­vok­ing discussion.

Image cour­tesy of The Museum of Mod­ern Art, New York.

New Year’s Eve in the Berkshires

Reverse

Mass­a­chu­setts Museum of Con­tem­po­rary Art, in North Adams, Massachusetts.

Things have been quiet around here over the hol­i­days. I turned 31 years old on Decem­ber 22, and then Lisa and I spent some time in Buf­falo with our folks, where I got to see my newest baby cousin Aline.

North Adams

The MASS MoCA cam­pus was once the Samp­son Shoe Company.
Sol LeWitt: A Wall Draw­ing Retrospective »
Anselm Kiefer: Sculp­ture and Paintings »

Then, after a few days back in Brook­lyn, we headed up to the Berk­shires for New Year’s Eve in North Adams – it’s not the most excit­ing town to ring in the new year, but we vis­ited MASS MoCA, stayed in a won­der­ful hotel called The Porches, and had the best meal North Adams has to offer at the Gramercy Bistro.

I didn’t do a lot of reflect­ing and resolution-making, but I am thank­ful for my fam­ily and friends, and for how great 2008 was for Lisa and I. Lisa is fond of say­ing that each year has been bet­ter than the last, which is more than one can hope for in this world.

More pho­tos below the jump.

Con­tinue read­ing ‘New Year’s Eve in the Berkshires’

A New Pair of Sox for the Red Sox

New Red Sox Identities

This design link is near and dear to my heart – The Boston Red Sox recently updated their team iden­tity and uni­forms. Over­all, I think it’s a pos­i­tive evo­lu­tion, though seems a bit nos­tol­gic. I love the gray pri­mary road jer­seys.

Armin Vit mostly likes what he sees:

Replac­ing the old seal as the team’s offi­cial logo is the lone pair of red, hang­ing sox. Unless I’m wrong, there is no typog­ra­phy asso­ci­ated with it. None. No “Boston.” No “Red Sox.” If that’s the case, this is one of the best cases of visual iden­tity and brand equity becom­ing so strong the icon doesn’t need expla­na­tion. They are sox. They are red. They can not be any­thing other than the Boston Red Sox.

Illus­tra­tion cour­tesy of Boston.com

Icon-maker Shepard Fairey — Person of the Year 2008 — TIME

TIME Person of The Year 2008 Cover

Shep­ard Fairey’s cover for TIME.

Time.com has a nice video inter­view with Shep­ard Fairey, designer of the HOPE and PROGRESS posters of Barack Obama that were nearly ubiq­ui­tous dur­ing the ’08 pres­i­den­tial cam­paign. Time Mag­a­zine named the President-Elect Per­son of the Year 2008, so it seemed only nat­ural to hire Fairey to do the cover.

In the video, he shows the process used to cre­ate the piece – tech­niques learned from his days as a screen printer.

Via Sean

Blur to Re-Form for Massive Hyde Park Gig

Blur to Re-Form for Mas­sive Hyde Park Gig »

It ended in acri­mony, with the gui­tarist brand­ing the singer an “ego­ma­niac”. But after months of spec­u­la­tion, Blur have con­firmed that they will be reunit­ing for a mas­sive gig in London’s Hyde Park next summer.

My favorite band of the 90s, together again for the first time since gui­tarist Gra­ham Coxon quit the band in 2002.

More: Blur In Video » | Review of Gra­ham Coxon Solo Show in 2005 »

Love Is All @ The Bowery Ballroom

light

Love Is All per­form­ing at the Bow­ery Ball­room, in Manhattan.

It was not as leg­endary as their first show at the Knit­ting Fac­tory, or the sweat-dripped set at Mar­ket Hotel in Bush­wick this past sum­mer, but Love Is All still knows how to bring it. They played a mix of songs from the new album A Hun­dred Things Keep Me Up At Night as well as from their debut, and even mixed in their Flock of Seag­ulls cover.

UPDATE: My Pho­tos on Flickr » | NYCTaper’s Audio From the Show

Bruce McCall on Letterman

I TiVo most of the late-night talk shows each night, in the hopes that some band or author that I love is fea­tured – some­how, that’s eas­ier than pre­emp­tively scan­ning TV Guide. But, I was gen­uinely sur­prised and thrilled to see the illus­tra­tor and writer Bruce McCall as a guest on David Letterman’s show, the other night.

I’m far too young to know his work from the National Lam­poon, but McCall’s New Yorker cov­ers are ingrained in my memory:

Bruce McCall New Yorker Covers

Some of Bruce McCall’s New Yorker cov­ers, from 1995–2008.

Letterman’s show might not have the cul­tural rel­e­vance that it once did, but you get the sense by watch­ing the seg­ment that he’d rather be sit­ting there talk­ing to McCall, than Mary-Kate or that chick from Twi­light. It’s just one of the many things that make Dave tick, and why I have a TiVo sea­son pass for the Late Show.

In the clip below, Let­ter­man and McCall look at and dis­cuss some of the work in McCall’s new children’s book, Mar­vel­town.

Con­tinue read­ing ‘Bruce McCall on Letterman’

The Mostly True Story of Helvetica and the New York City Subway

The Mostly True Story of Hel­vetica and the New York City Subway:

There is a com­monly held belief that Hel­vetica is the sig­nage type­face of the New York City sub­way sys­tem, a belief rein­forced by Hel­vetica, Gary Hustwit’s pop­u­lar 2007 doc­u­men­tary about the type­face. But it is not true—or rather, it is only some­what true. Hel­vetica is the offi­cial type­face of the MTA today, but it was not the type­face spec­i­fied by Uni­mark Inter­na­tional when it cre­ated a new sig­nage sys­tem at the end of the 1960s.

r-train

R-train icon, set in Hel­vetica and Standard.

I noticed this dis­crep­ancy ear­lier this year – I had to recre­ate some MTA sub­way icons for use on a project, and noticed that the R train map icon looked noth­ing like the Hel­vetica “R”. The MTA’s own web­site seems to be con­fused about the type used in the sys­tem icons, let alone its sta­tion signage.

Enter typog­ra­pher Paul Shaw, and his 10,000+ word piece on AIGA’s site. Did you now that Boston’s sub­way sig­nage sys­tem was the first to use Hel­vetica, with­out mod­i­fi­ca­tions? Ever curi­ous as to the process by which enamel signs are made? Want to just look at pretty pic­tures of sub­way signs over the years?

It’s a great his­tory, for fans of typog­ra­phy and the MTA.

Saving Buffalo’s Untold Beauty

Downtown Buffalo

Photo Credit: Tony Cenicola/The New York TimesA photo of down­town Buffalo.

The Times had a great piece yes­ter­day on Buffalo’s archi­tec­tural legacy, and recent attempts to save his­toric buildings:

Buf­falo is home to some of the great­est Amer­i­can archi­tec­ture of the late 19th and early 20th cen­turies, with major archi­tects like Henry Hob­son Richard­son, Fred­er­ick Law Olm­sted, Louis Sul­li­van and Frank Lloyd Wright build­ing mar­vels here. Together they shaped one of the grand­est early visions of the demo­c­ra­tic Amer­i­can city.

Yet Buf­falo is more com­monly iden­ti­fied with the crum­bling infra­struc­ture, aban­doned homes and dwin­dling jobs that have defined the Rust Belt for the past 50 years. And for decades its archi­tec­ture has seemed strangely frozen in time.

There is also an accom­pa­ny­ing slide show, from which the photo above was taken.

Full dis­clo­sure: I’m orig­i­nally from Buffalo.

What’s Hebrew for “Yes We Can”?

Well, that didnt’t take long – given the suc­cess of Barack Obama’s dig­i­tal and design strat­egy in our recent pres­i­den­tial elec­tion, some­one was bound to, ahem… com­pletely rip him off, sooner or later.

Sur­pris­ingly, the most recent exam­ple is the cam­paign of Ben­jamin Netanyahu, the con­ser­v­a­tive Likud leader run­ning for prime min­is­ter of Israel. The Times reports:

The col­ors, the fonts, the icons for donat­ing and vol­un­teer­ing, the use of embed­ded video, and the social net­work­ing Facebook-type options — includ­ing Twit­ter, which hardly exists in Israel — all reflect a con­scious effort by the Netanyahu cam­paign to learn from the Obama success.

I won­der if that type is the Hebrew Gotham?

wp-Hyphenate by KINGdesk

Wp-Hyphenate is a very promis­ing plu­gin for Word­Press, because it enables some typo­graph­i­cal con­trol not pre­vi­ously avail­able for the web:

With it your left aligned text will be less ragged, and your jus­ti­fied text will avoid the ghastly word spac­ing that has pre­vented seri­ous web design­ers from using it.

It’s still in its early stages, but I’m exper­i­ment­ing with it here – using jus­ti­fied para­graphs and block­quotes. Let me know what you think.

Out of the box, the plu­gin broke my linked flickr image codes, so I had to put <a> tags on the whitelist, so the plu­gin ignores any linked text. Hope­fully that issue will be addressed in the future.

UPDATE: Nov 16, 2008 – Jeff King has updated his plu­gin to address the issue described above.

Grant Park — Alex Wright

My col­league at NYTimes.com, Alex Wright, hap­pened to be in Chicago last night, so he made his way to the Grant Park cel­e­bra­tion. I’m sure that will be a moment to remem­ber for some time.

Newsweek’s “Hackers and Spending Sprees”

Newsweek.com has some inter­est­ing tid­bits about the recently com­pleted pres­i­den­tial elec­tion between Obama/Biden and McCain/Palin:

  • Palin’s “rogue” shop­ping spree was greater than the ear­lier reported $150,000.
  • Obama didn’t choose Hillary Clin­ton for the VP slot mostly because of her husband.
  • Palin appeared with noth­ing on save for a towel, when McCain aides and strate­gists came to her hotel room to brief her at the Repub­li­can Convention.
  • Obama thinks some debate ques­tions are stupid.

More will be released on Newsweek.com in the com­ing days.

Who Said Print is Dead?

OBAMA

Today’s edi­tion of the New York Times.

I count myself lucky today, for scor­ing a copy of the paper before they ran out. Appar­ently, the sit­u­a­tion is the same through­out the city, (though I’ve heard rumors of another 50,000 copy run).

In fact, there are a hun­dred or so peo­ple stand­ing on line out­side the Times head­quar­ters, wait­ing for a fresh deliv­ery of news, printed on dead trees.

Print Isn’t Dead

A hun­dred or so peo­ple, wait­ing on line for today’s paper, in front of the Times head­quar­ters in midtown.

From Gawker:

Every­body wants a sou­venir of Obama’s vic­tory, and you know what makes a great sou­venir? That’s right, a news­pa­per. This is a photo of a line out­side the NYT build­ing on 40th Street of peo­ple waiting—for a newspaper!

I hope that peo­ple still come to the Times for more than just a souvenir.

New York Times Anthrax Scare

Who?

Equip­ment and offi­cials from some gov­ern­ment agency that I’ve never heard of, in the lobby of the New York Times Build­ing in midtown.

The lobby of The New York Times Build­ing, where I work, was closed this past Wednes­day, after an employee on the 13th floor opened an enve­lope that con­tained a pow­dery sub­stance. (The 13th floor is where the edi­to­r­ial board and some colum­nists have offices.)

It turned out to be a hoax, but for sev­eral hours the build­ing was in near lock-down mode. Unfor­tu­nately, I decided to dis­re­gard warn­ings and went out to meet Lisa for lunch. When I returned, I was locked out for almost an hour, as the police had roped off the building’s entrances. Peer­ing through the win­dows on the 8th Avenue side of the build­ing, I saw a huge cur­tain stretched across one of the ele­va­tor banks. Some fire­men went in with a stretcher, and the broad­cast news media started con­verg­ing on the street. (Apolo­gies to the very friendly NY1 cam­er­a­woman, for refus­ing to talk to her on camera.)

All I could do was to take some pho­tos, and wait to be let in. After about an hour, I received word from a col­league inside that they were let­ting employ­ees back in through the freight ele­va­tors in the load­ing dock down 40th st. That was about all the fun I could han­dle for one day… back to work.

More Pho­tos below the jump.

Con­tinue read­ing ‘New York Times Anthrax Scare’

How Hackers Show it’s Not All Bad News at the New York Times

Apolo­gies that this blog looks a lit­tle New York Times-y lately, but I had to share this – O’Reilly’s Andrew Savikas wrote a very inter­est­ing post on some of the inter­est­ing stuff we’re doing:

…there‘s some­thing going on at the Times that prob­a­bly won‘t make it to Sil­i­con Alley Insider, much less the main­stream busi­ness press, and it‘s some­thing that‘s start­ing to make me think the Times just might suc­ceed in adapt­ing to the chang­ing rules of the media and pub­lish­ing game…

So what’s the Times doing that’s so impor­tant? They’re hack­ing.

Savikas goes on to list a lot of exam­ples, but the best one that I can pro­vide is the com­ing release of our APIs, which will enable peo­ple on the out­side to play, tin­ker, and mashup NY Times con­tent. There are only a few APIs cur­rently pub­lic, but there will be a flood of releases in the com­ing months.

[via Jeremy]

UPDATE: Oh man, a bit after I pub­lished this today, we launched our Visu­al­iza­tion Lab – a part­ner­ship that uses IBM’s Many Eyes tech­nol­ogy. More Info Here »

What the Hell, Malcolm Gladwell

My friend Julia writes today on Huff­in­g­ton Post – What the Hell, Mal­colm Glad­well. She takes the Tip­ping Point author to task for not includ­ing one woman in his new book Out­liers, which exam­ines high achievers:

But what about Vir­ginia Woolf, Susan Son­tag, Tina Brown, or Indra Nooyi, the CEO of PepsiCo?

What about Oprah?

The omis­sion of women in Out­liers says more about the nature of “big think” books than it does about Mr. Gladwell.

I think that lets him off the hook easy, but it’s inter­est­ing to read Julia’s thoughts on the book pub­lish­ing world. She posts reg­u­larly to the Harper Stu­dio blog, at 26thstory.com.