Tag Archive for 'design'

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Font Conference

What if fonts were peo­ple? A fun­ny video from the gang at CollegeHumor.com.

Infographics

I com­plet­ed a three-day inten­sive news­room ori­en­ta­tion last week, in which the new faces at the Times are trained on poli­cies, prac­tices, and quirks of the paper. It’s an onboard­ing pro­ce­dure the likes of which I’ve nev­er gone through in my career, and I think it’s a cred­it to the orga­ni­za­tion that they care so much about its tra­di­tions and cul­ture to invest so much time and ener­gy wel­com­ing new peo­ple.

In addi­tion to the sem­i­nars on sourc­ing, ethics and back­ground, it was espe­cial­ly inter­est­ing to meet all of the Desk Edi­tors and learn how they run their teams both online and in print. One-by-one, they filed in from Nation­al, Style, Trav­el, For­eign, the Mag­a­zines… it was a whirl­wind 3 days.

infographic
Deadly Rampage at Virginia Tech, updated April 23, 2007

One of the most inter­est­ing half-hours was pre­sent­ed by Archie Tse, a Graph­ics edi­tor. Archie explained how the Times Graph­ics Desk is real­ly unique among news orga­ni­za­tions, in that they go out and do report­ing before sit­ting down at their com­put­er.

When you con­sid­er that news­pa­pers are cut­ting back on cov­er­age of every­thing these days, this is remark­able.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Info­graph­ics’

405 Sunset

While we were in Boston this past week­end, we stopped by our friend Lind­sey Warren’s stu­dio at BU, where she is just com­plet­ing her MFA in paint­ing. She just sold a bunch of work at the grad­u­ate stu­dent show a few weeks back, and still has some amaz­ing stuff left. We also got to see some works in progress – includ­ing some inter­est­ing print­mak­ing.

But, the best thing about the vis­it was that we pur­chased an amaz­ing paint­ing, 405 Sun­set:

405 Sunset

This paint­ing was fea­tured in the Boston Globe Mag­a­zine last sum­mer:

Lind­sey War­ren uses lurid col­ors and a sur­pris­ing range of tex­tures to evoke a world shim­mer­ing on the edge of dis­so­lu­tion, from the woodsy, dap­pled ‘Pow­er Out­age’ to the crisp, sun-stroked ‘405 Sun­set.’

So we’re excit­ed to get this piece to Brook­lyn, but that will take some time since it mea­sures 4′x 5′– we’ll have to get it crat­ed and shipped.

Take a look at her work, and con­tact her if you’re inter­est­ed in stop­ping by her stu­dio – she’ll be there until mid-June.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘405 Sun­set’

McCain’s Optimum Look

Can a type­face tru­ly rep­re­sent a pres­i­den­tial can­di­date? Yes­ter­day on the Times’ Cam­paign Stops blog, Steven Heller invit­ed sev­er­al design­ers and crit­ics to com­ment on John McCain’s use of Opti­ma for cam­paign col­lat­er­al.

Is it dat­ed? Clas­sic? Does it con­vey strength? Or, quirk­i­ness? The replies run the gamut; many of them fun­ny or tongue-in-cheek. Michael Beirut notes the font’s resem­blance to the one used to carve the names on the Viet­nam Vet­er­ans Memo­r­i­al, and Matthew Carter mus­es about how the type­face will hold up with the addi­tion of a run­ning mate this sum­mer. But, my favorite judge­ment comes at the end, from Rudy Van­der­Lans:

What does Opti­ma say about Sen­a­tor McCain? Noth­ing. It prob­a­bly says more about the design­er than any­thing else. Who, except design­ers, would judge a can­di­date by the type­face?

Oh, and ear­li­er this month, Heller did a sim­i­lar dis­cus­sion with brand­ing expert Bri­an Collins, on Obama’s Gotham-heavy design scheme.

On Video

I didn’t make any excit­ing res­o­lu­tions this New Year, except to get back to my fight­ing weight, and land a more per­ma­nent design job. Look­ing back on 2007, one thing that stands out is that my Flickr pho­to­stream final­ly became a more real-time pho­to reflec­tion of my life, with the con­ve­nience of my iPhone and its unlim­it­ed data plan. Sure, the qual­i­ty of my pho­tog­ra­phy might have dete­ri­o­rat­ed, but I’ve always pre­ferred to shoot from the hip any­way. The iPhone suits what I want to do with Flickr.

But for 2008, I’d like to make one small res­o­lu­tion: do more with video. I bought a new point-and-shoot cam­era that does OK VGA video, (Canon Dig­i­tal Elph SD750), so I want to put it to use. It’s out­put is a lit­tle grainy, espe­cial­ly in low light, but I think it suits what I want to do with it.

Here is a lit­tle idea that I got while walk­ing around the Meat­pack­ing dis­trict this past week­end: the The­o­ry store on Gan­sevoort street has these amaz­ing pul­sat­ing col­ored lights in the win­dow – so I shot them, and then looped them in iMovie, set to The Knife’s live arrange­ment of “Heart­beats”:

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘On Video’

Playing Around with the Google Chart API

I’ve been play­ing around with the new Google Chart API, released ear­li­er today. The API enables easy cre­ation of charts, dynam­i­cal­ly:

The Google Chart API returns a PNG-for­mat image in response to a URL. Sev­er­al types of image can be gen­er­at­ed: line, bar, and pie charts for exam­ple. For each image type you can spec­i­fy attrib­ut­es such as size, col­ors, and labels.

My exam­ple is shown below. I can think of a lot more con­ve­nient meth­ods of cre­at­ing graphs, espe­cial­ly when chartable data is usu­al­ly already in Excel or Num­bers spread­sheets. Still, pret­ty fun to play around with – check out what Bri­an Suda makes of it, on 24ways.

Chart

AIGA/NY 2007 Holiday Party

AIGA/NY Hol­i­day Par­ty: DANCE/DANCE/DANCE
SUNDAY, 9 DEC ’07 from 6:00–10:00PM // Snacks, drinks, danc­ing, and a live auc­tion by auc­tion­eer­ing expert extra­or­di­naire, John Hodg­man.

I am not a mem­ber (yet), but think­ing about going. It’s worth it just for the wrap­ping paper.

UPDATE: My one pho­to of John Hodg­man is below the fold.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘AIGA/NY 2007 Hol­i­day Par­ty’

Banksy Opening

snuff

This past Sun­day, we attend­ed the Banksy open­ing at the Van­i­na Holasek Gallery in Chelsea. I love Banksy’s work, but it seemed a lit­tle odd to see his sten­ciled work framed and mat­ted in a gallery, with pen­ciled-in price tags labeled on the wall – $30k, $60k, $150k. It seemed a far cry from the street art and sub­ver­sive work that he’s known for.

Still, he’s one of the more inter­est­ing con­tem­po­rary artists out there – Lau­ren Collins has a nice pro­file piece, from The New York­er in May. And, I love his album art­work for Blur’s last LP, in 2003.

More pho­tos, and a video of Banksy’s sub­ver­sive muse­um activ­i­ty below the fold.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Banksy Open­ing’

24 ways: Transparent PNGs in IE 6

Glad to see 24 ways is back, for some hol­i­day (web dev) cheer! Look for a new arti­cle every day until Xmas:

When I find some time, I’ll look into mak­ing this site a lit­tle more con­sis­tent in IE6. They’ve also got a nice archive, from pre­vi­ous hol­i­day sea­sons.

Brooklyn Neighborhood Poster, by Ork Posters

Brooklyn Neighborhood Poster, by Ork PostersI love this typo­graph­i­cal poster of Brook­lyn neigh­bor­hoods, by Ork Posters of Chica­go.

It won’t help me fig­ure out the “offi­cial” bound­aries of Car­roll Gar­dens, but it sure is pret­ty.

[via swiss­miss]

Rooftop Legends

In High School, I was always jeal­ous of oth­er kids who knew exact­ly what they want­ed to do with their life – it took me until half-way through col­lege before I real­ly found my call­ing, which explains my lib­er­al arts degree.

So, I’m amazed that there is a Design High School in the Low­er East Side. It has a pret­ty inter­est­ing mis­sion:

We believe that when stu­dents are engaged in the process of design­ing, they are learn­ing to observe, seek prob­lems, iden­ti­fy needs, frame prob­lems, work col­lab­o­ra­tive­ly, explore and appre­ci­ate solu­tions, weigh alter­na­tives, and com­mu­ni­cate their ideas ver­bal­ly, graph­i­cal­ly and phys­i­cal­ly.

And they even invit­ed artists, stu­dents, and staff to cre­ate stree­tart on the roof of the school. Here is a video, from Rock­et­boom:

Very cool stuff.

A New boston.com

new Boston.com
The new Boston.com

I just noticed that boston.com launched a redesigned site, and it looks very nice. You can read the editor’s redesign note here.

The new look is much wider, open, and eas­i­er to read. The Globe page espe­cial­ly shines, though they could bet­ter dis­trib­ute some of the paper’s con­tent across the columns. (And, I wish that they’d ditch the awful curvy logo for some­thing less whim­si­cal.)

Some sec­tions on the site remain unchanged for now – which, accord­ing to the redesign FAQ, was inten­tion­al:

Dif­fer­ent fea­tures and sec­tions of the site are sched­uled to debut on dif­fer­ent days. While we real­ize that this might be con­fus­ing in the short-term, we’ve stud­ied our options care­ful­ly and believe that the grad­ual switch we have planned will ulti­mate­ly result in a bet­ter user expe­ri­ence.

Err, or that was a lot to roll out at once. Still, great improve­ment.

Unoriginal

copy cattimothytipton.com is using a slight­ly mod­i­fied ver­sion of my K2 stylesheet, with­out att­tri­bu­tion.

The post lay­out is the same, and he’s using the same exact side­bar mod­ules, in exact­ly the same arrange­ment. His CSS is full of my cus­tom selectors/classes, and is still hot link­ing to images on my domain.

It’s one thing to take some­one else’s work, pick it apart, and learn from it. It’s quite anoth­er to just take someone’s work, remove attri­bu­tion, and tweak it just enough so that it has your name on it.

My site is built-off of the K2 frame­work, which is the work of a lot of excel­lent design­ers and devel­op­ers. The dif­fer­ence is that I’m upfront about attri­bu­tion, AND, I’ve tak­en the time and care to fash­ion some­thing new.

So, Tim­o­thy, might I sug­gest read­ing Greg Story’s post on How to prop­er­ly steal the design of a web­site?

I ran a diff on the two stylesheets, and took some screen­shots:

no attributionbreaking IMG references instead of removing?hotlinking to IMG on my domaincopying IMGs over to your own servercustom selectors

2007 Web Design Survey

A List Apart releas­es the results of their 2007 Web Design Sur­vey, and I’m feel­ing nice­ly aver­age for my pro­fes­sion.

Close to 33,000 web pro­fes­sion­als answered the survey’s 37 ques­tions, pro­vid­ing the first data ever col­lect­ed on the busi­ness of web design and devel­op­ment as prac­ticed in the U.S. and world­wide.

ALA pro­vides a PDF with the survey’s find­ings, but they also pro­vide the raw date in Excel for­mat, which you’re free to play around with, piv­ot, and chart.

Business Week Redesign

Business Week redesignI saw that over at Brand New today, that Busi­ness Week mag­a­zine has done an inter­est­ing rebrand­ing and redesign.

Noth­ing major on the logo­type — gone are the ser­ifs. But, between the cov­ers is the real treat:

It’s inside that the mag­a­zine feels more rel­e­vant with a clean design and con­sis­tent typo­graph­ic treat­ments that sway you from begin­ning to end. Sim­ple size shifts from front of the book to fea­ture sto­ries to back of the book are enough indi­ca­tors that you are chang­ing sec­tions with­out resort­ing to extra fan­cy open­ing spreads for the fea­ture sto­ries.

It has a very crisp and mod­ern look, remind­ing me a bit of CNN International’s on-screen design. I wish oth­er Amer­i­can pub­li­ca­tions and media would take this approach. The worst offend­ers are sport broad­cast­ers, who use tick­ers, graph­ics, and pic­ture-in-pic­ture inter­views to do every­thing but show you the game.

UPDATE: David Sleight takes a look at the typog­ra­phy behind the redesign.

Splat!

It’s been near­ly 24-hours since I relaunched this weblog, and the feed­back has been encour­ag­ing. Thanks to every­one who emailed or left a com­ment.

I talked last night about my desire to use a typo­graph­i­cal grid for this design, but I also knew that this had the poten­tial to look quite anti­sep­tic and ster­ile. I thought of the com­ment that David Car­son makes in the Hel­veti­ca film, as he points to the word “caf­feinat­ed” that has been print­ed out in Hel­veti­ca Black and hung on the wall next to oth­er iden­ti­cal look­ing words: “This doesn’t say ‘caf­feinat­ed’!” To avoid the trap, I need­ed to work in a design ele­ment that would make things a lit­tle more inter­est­ing.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Splat!’

A New Nedward.org

Today, I’m launch­ing ver­sion 6 of nedward.org, a typo­graph­i­cal grid-based lay­out, with heavy use of Hel­veti­ca Neue. This site has always used a sim­i­lar shade of green, so I want­ed to main­tain that bit of con­sis­ten­cy with the past, while intro­duc­ing some­thing very dif­fer­ent. I also want­ed to bring togeth­er my con­tent from twit­ter, flickr, del.icio.us, and last.fm, while keep­ing it dis­tinct from the weblog con­tent — yea, I’ve gone back on my post is a post com­ments.

The last major revi­sion of this site was launched on May 1 2005, but even that was some­what of a realign­ment of the pre­vi­ous design, which dat­ed back to 2001. I’m a big pro­po­nent of Cameron Moll’s realign not redesign rule — so I spent the past few years tin­ker­ing away, refin­ing the same basic lay­out.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘A New Nedward.org’

Designed Deterioration”, and the return of Links

Now that I have 2 days left at my cur­rent job, and a big move to NYC com­ing, I’m going to attempt to post more often. A new design for the weblog is also in the works, but not sure when I’ll get to it.

In that spir­it, I found myself read­ing and re-read­ing Khoi’s recent post about how we val­ue objects that dete­ri­o­rate in a cool way. Khoi is far more elo­quent than I can be, so just go there and read it:

So far, I’ve resist­ed the urge to get a case for my iPhone, but I know that regret will set in the moment that i drop the thing for real.

Also, I used to just have del.icio.us dump my book­marks into a post on the Weblog, but once a day is way too much… and, there are plen­ty of things that I don’t want/need in my weblog.

Appar­ent­ly, I’m not the only one feel­ing that way — Andre Tor­rez came up with a nice fil­ter between del.icio.us and our weblogs -

I cus­tomized his work a bit, which you can see here. Well done.

Now, I’ve got to make this thing worth check­ing in on (or sub­scrib­ing to) again.

SXSW: Day 1

4 rest­less hours of sleep, and 1 Jet­blue direct flight from BOS to AUS, and I found myself in Austin. Checked into the hotel and met up with the EchoDit­to folks, and oth­er friends. There are like 4 Jasons, 2 Justins, a John (me) — so it gets con­fus­ing.

70 degrees here, 55 or so at night. This fes­ti­val total­ly takes over the city. Met some cool peo­ple last night, and the first pan­el this morn­ing was cool — i start­ed in “why XSLT is sexy”, but bailed for “emerg­ing social and tech­nol­o­gy trends”. Next up, “How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0”, with Andy Budd & Jere­my Kei­th… which I expect to be hilar­i­ous.

Only com­plaints are that the hotel is a bit of a walk, across the riv­er. And, i’m sick… so i’m com­plete­ly grog­gy and don’t feel like talk­ing to any­body. but, i’ll get over it.

Anoth­er prob­lem is try­ing to explain my job, and what the Local­iza­tion indus­try is. It comes off sound­ing real­ly lame, con­sid­er­ing every­body I talk to works small design shops…

So if you have any ideas how to punch it up a bit, let me know.

SXSW ’07

Things have been so hec­tic with work late­ly, there’s been no time to update.

I’ll be attend­ing the SXSW Inter­ac­tive Fes­ti­val this year in Austin, TX. I just couldn’t let anoth­er year go by.

I’m crash­ing with Jason and the EchoDit­to crew at the Hyatt — can’t wait to meet every­body.

links for 2006-08-07

Behind the Type­face: Coop­er Black
Hilar­i­ous spoof of the VH1 sta­ple, with lots of inter­est­ing facts about a very famil­iar type­face.

Hel­veti­ca: the Film
A fea­ture-length inde­pen­dent film about typog­ra­phy, graph­ic design and glob­al visu­al cul­ture. Thank god for the Swiss.

John­ny Marr Joins Mod­est Mouse
Leg­endary Smiths’ gui­tarist had been writ­ing and record­ing with the band, but is now “a full blown mem­ber”, accord­ing to front man Isaac Brock.

OK GOHere It Goes Again video
Hilar­i­ous chore­og­ra­phy, OK music. I will nev­er look at a tread­mill the same again. [via Airbag]

ICA Boston

IMG_2306

Photo, originally uploaded by droush16.

It looks like the new ICA on the South Boston water­front has to delay it’s Sep­tem­ber open­ing:

In inter­views yes­ter­day, ICA offi­cials, archi­tect Ricar­do Scofidio, and con­struc­tion com­pa­ny man­ag­er John Macomber said that the remain­ing work was not major. Among the pend­ing tasks—termed “minu­ti­ae” by one ICA trustee—was the need to test the building’s tick­et counter and cli­mate con­trol sys­tem.

[via]

Adobe Flash Player 9

Prod­uct Man­ag­er Emmy Huang writes in the Adobe Devel­op­ment Cen­ter:

As we looked at our goals for Flash Play­er 9, how­ev­er, we real­ized that it would be too lim­it­ing to con­tin­ue to evolve the exist­ing engine. We want­ed to cre­ate a water­shed moment in the his­to­ry of Flash Play­er, and to deliv­er it we need­ed to be able to inno­vate with­out con­straint.

As a result, Action­Script 3.0 is essen­tial­ly a full rewrite of the Action­Script engine. Action­Script 3.0 exe­cutes in a new, high­ly-opti­mized vir­tu­al machine known as AVM2, which we built for effi­cien­cy and per­for­mance. Although AVM2 will be the pri­ma­ry vir­tu­al machine for Action­Script exe­cu­tion going for­ward, Flash Play­er will con­tin­ue to sup­port the old­er AVM1 for back­wards com­pat­i­bil­i­ty with exist­ing and lega­cy con­tent.

How­ev­er, in order to take advan­tage of the new fea­tures, we’ll have to wait for the release of Flash Pro­fes­sion­al 9, (or play around with an alpha patch for Flash 8), accord­ing to the FAQ:

Design­ers and devel­op­ers inter­est­ed in using new Flash Play­er 9 fea­tures are wel­come to explore the pub­lic alpha of Adobe Flash Pro­fes­sion­al 9 Action­Script 3.0 avail­able on Adobe Labs.

It’s curi­ous­ly timed… isn’t it unprece­dent­ed for Macromedia/Adobe releas­ing Play­er 9 almost a year in advance of Flash Pro­fes­sion­al 9? And, I don’t think that we’ll see wide-spread adop­tion until there is actu­al­ly some Flash 9 con­tent out there on the web. I’ll start pay­ing atten­tion in 2007.

The New NYTimes.com

The New York Times launched a mod­est redesign over the week­end, and it does a great job of pre­sent­ing large amounts of infor­ma­tion in a coher­ent, orga­nized way.

new NYTimes.com

The new homepage of NYTimes.com.

Khoi has the details on his weblog:

I think it’s a ster­ling piece of work, a great exam­ple of how to evolve a user expe­ri­ence rather than rein­vent it: the best reac­tion it could receive from read­ers (those not among that van­ish­ing­ly small sub­set of the gen­er­al pop­u­lace who can be called “design savvy”) would be some­thing along the lines of “The new design looks just like the old design.” That would suit me fine, because it would sig­nal a con­ti­nu­ity that I think is com­plete­ly appro­pri­ate for such a close­ly watched site like The New York Times’, and besides, I know for a fact that it’s more ele­gant and more use­ful than it was before.

And though Khoi says that he is not respon­si­ble for the design, it’s clear to me that who­ev­er is was heav­i­ly influ­enced by his work – espe­cial­ly the recent re-launch of The Onion. Bra­vo!

Beer Logos in Vector Format

Boddingtons BitterI love this site, which offers tons of beer logos for down­load, in EPS for­mat [via]. For some rea­son, this amus­es me.

What didn’t amuse me, was the 20 min­utes of frus­tra­tion last night, try­ing to get a freakin’ Bod­ding­tons at The Bur­ren in Davis Square. I had to order twice, from the same woman, (as she must’ve for­got the first one)… and final­ly I grabbed a sec­ond bar­tender to go check on things. And, HE was the one who brought me my freakin’ beer. I real­ize that a lot of bar­tenders dou­ble-pour Boddy’s, (much like Guin­ness), but you’re not sup­posed to for­get me!