Tag Archive for 'newspapers'

The Times Wins 5 Pulitzer Prizes

NY Times newsroom, Pulitzer announcement

Photo by Soraya.

The New York Times, my employer, won 5 Pulitzer Prizes today, “for work on sub­jects as var­ied as America’s wars in Asia, the sud­den down­fall of a polit­i­cal titan, art from ancient to mod­ern, and a history-making pres­i­den­tial campaign.”

The inter­est­ing one, from my point of view, is the award for break­ing the Gov. Eliot Spitzer pros­ti­tu­tion scan­dal. No, not because it’s sala­cious or bawdy, but because the exclu­sive wasn’t held for the next morning’s paper – it was put up online, on NYTimes.com, in the mid­dle of the day. I think that this will be an impor­tant mile­stone in the evo­lu­tion of qual­ity journalism.

The Nie­man Lab points to a funny anec­dote that ran in the NY Observer last year:

Back in the day — you know, five years ago — when a big news story had been writ­ten, edited, fact-checked, vet­ted, proof­read, and anguished over one last time, an adrenaline-pumped edi­tor would cry out, “Run it!” As in, the presses.

When The New York Times was ready to report that Eliot Spitzer, then gov­er­nor of New York, had been impli­cated in a pros­ti­tu­tion ring, man­ag­ing edi­tor Jill Abram­son yelled 20 feet across the news­room, “O.K., hit it!” As in, the but­ton to pub­lish the story on NYTimes.com.

I love that. Con­grats to my col­leagues in the news room, and let’s keep it up!

The Crash of Flight 3407

Flight 3407 – Reuters

CREDIT: Gary Wiepert, Reuters [via]

Last night, Con­ti­nen­tal Flight 3407 crashed in route from Newark to Buf­falo Nia­gara Inter­na­tional Air­port, just a few miles from its sched­uled des­ti­na­tion. The crash site is just five or six miles from where I grew up, in a sub­urb of Buf­falo, NY.

The Buf­falo News has a liv­ing topic page ded­i­cated to cov­er­age of the event, which they are updat­ing with arti­cles, pho­tos, video and other resources, as they are put up. They also started live blog­ging the story, and link­ing to out­side resources pro­vided by cit­i­zen journalists.

CNN is car­ry­ing live video from the local NBC affli­ate.

My heart goes out to the vic­tims, their fam­i­lies and the nearby com­mu­ni­ties. It’s impor­tant to remem­ber that these things rarely hap­pen, but when they do, espe­cially so close to home, it’s impos­si­ble not to feel sad.

U.S. Airways Jet Crashes Into Hudson River

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue

My photo from the 21st floor of the New York Times Build­ing, in midtown.

From City Room:

A USAir­ways plane that took off at 3:26 p.m. from La Guardia Air­port landed in the Hud­son River five min­utes later, where it remains mostly sub­merged. Fer­ries and other boats con­verged to help with a res­cue effort, as the plane drifted south. There was no imme­di­ate infor­ma­tion about the 151 peo­ple on board.

Accord­ing to Chan­nel 4 tele­vi­sion news, the plane, USAir­ways flight 1549, took off from LaGuardia Air­port at 3:26 p.m. was bound for Char­lotte, N.C. and had 146 pas­sen­gers and 5 crew mem­bers. The plane, accord­ing to the news report, may have hit a flock of birds. The pilot tried to return to the air­port when the plane fell into the Hudson.

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue

Photo of the res­cue, posted by Janis Krums on Twitter/Twitpic.

I watched from the 21st floor of the Times Build­ing, as the plan drifted south with the tide. I believe that the res­cue oper­a­tion com­pleted before it came into view, and it has since drifted out of view.

The plane did not break up on impact; divers, com­muter fer­ries and a lot of emer­gency per­son­nel are assist­ing with res­cue oper­a­tions. Every­one is reported to have sur­vived the crash and res­cue, as of this moment, but there are injuries. CNN is cur­rently inter­view­ing pas­sen­gers, live on-air.

UPDATE: I don’t know how the Graph­ics team put this together so quickly and so ele­gantly, but NYTimes.com has an inter­ac­tive piece today, that tracks the plane’s path.

Also, CNN has been run­ning a Google Earth ani­ma­tion of the flight, which is less pretty, but kind of cool.

NY Magazine on Innovation at the Times

Renegades

Aron Pil­hofer, Andrew DeVi­gal, Steve Duenes, Matthew Eric­son, and Gabriel Dance.
Photo cour­tesy NY Mag / Mike McGregor
Elec­tion Day Word Train »
Faces of the Dead »
Pogue-o-matic »

Sure there’s been a lot of recent bad news about the New York Times Com­pany, and news­pa­pers coast-to-coast are pulling back cov­er­age, fil­ing for bank­ruptcy and clos­ing. But there is also another story to tell.

New York Mag­a­zine has a piece in this week’s issue on the Times Mul­ti­me­dia, Graph­ics, Inter­ac­tive Tech and R&D groups, titled The New Jour­nal­ism: Goos­ing the Gray Lady. It details some of the orga­ni­za­tional steps taken by the Times, in order to posi­tion itself for the day when the online prod­uct eclipses the print edi­tion in reach, rev­enue and relevance.

Con­tinue read­ing ‘NY Mag­a­zine on Inno­va­tion at the Times’

Who Said Print is Dead?

OBAMA

Today’s edi­tion of the New York Times.

I count myself lucky today, for scor­ing a copy of the paper before they ran out. Appar­ently, the sit­u­a­tion is the same through­out the city, (though I’ve heard rumors of another 50,000 copy run).

In fact, there are a hun­dred or so peo­ple stand­ing on line out­side the Times head­quar­ters, wait­ing for a fresh deliv­ery of news, printed on dead trees.

Print Isn’t Dead

A hun­dred or so peo­ple, wait­ing on line for today’s paper, in front of the Times head­quar­ters in midtown.

From Gawker:

Every­body wants a sou­venir of Obama’s vic­tory, and you know what makes a great sou­venir? That’s right, a news­pa­per. This is a photo of a line out­side the NYT build­ing on 40th Street of peo­ple waiting—for a newspaper!

I hope that peo­ple still come to the Times for more than just a souvenir.

Infographics

I com­pleted a three-day inten­sive news­room ori­en­ta­tion last week, in which the new faces at the Times are trained on poli­cies, prac­tices, and quirks of the paper. It’s an onboard­ing pro­ce­dure the likes of which I’ve never gone through in my career, and I think it’s a credit to the orga­ni­za­tion that they care so much about its tra­di­tions and cul­ture to invest so much time and energy wel­com­ing new people.

In addi­tion to the sem­i­nars on sourc­ing, ethics and back­ground, it was espe­cially inter­est­ing to meet all of the Desk Edi­tors and learn how they run their teams both online and in print. One-by-one, they filed in from National, Style, Travel, For­eign, the Mag­a­zines… it was a whirl­wind 3 days.

infographic

Deadly Ram­page at Vir­ginia Tech, updated April 23, 2007

One of the most inter­est­ing half-hours was pre­sented by Archie Tse, a Graph­ics edi­tor. Archie explained how the Times Graph­ics Desk is really unique among news orga­ni­za­tions, in that they go out and do report­ing before sit­ting down at their computer.

When you con­sider that news­pa­pers are cut­ting back on cov­er­age of every­thing these days, this is remarkable.

Con­tinue read­ing ‘Infographics’

A New boston.com

new Boston.com

The new Boston.com

I just noticed that boston.com launched a redesigned site, and it looks very nice. You can read the editor’s redesign note here.

The new look is much wider, open, and eas­ier to read. The Globe page espe­cially shines, though they could bet­ter dis­trib­ute some of the paper’s con­tent across the columns. (And, I wish that they’d ditch the awful curvy logo for some­thing less whimsical.)

Some sec­tions on the site remain unchanged for now – which, accord­ing to the redesign FAQ, was intentional:

Dif­fer­ent fea­tures and sec­tions of the site are sched­uled to debut on dif­fer­ent days. While we real­ize that this might be con­fus­ing in the short-term, we’ve stud­ied our options care­fully and believe that the grad­ual switch we have planned will ulti­mately result in a bet­ter user experience.

Err, or that was a lot to roll out at once. Still, great improvement.

The New NYTimes.com

The New York Times launched a mod­est redesign over the week­end, and it does a great job of pre­sent­ing large amounts of infor­ma­tion in a coher­ent, orga­nized way.

new NYTimes.com

The new home­page of NYTimes.com.

Khoi has the details on his weblog:

I think it’s a ster­ling piece of work, a great exam­ple of how to evolve a user expe­ri­ence rather than rein­vent it: the best reac­tion it could receive from read­ers (those not among that van­ish­ingly small sub­set of the gen­eral pop­u­lace who can be called “design savvy”) would be some­thing along the lines of “The new design looks just like the old design.” That would suit me fine, because it would sig­nal a con­ti­nu­ity that I think is com­pletely appro­pri­ate for such a closely watched site like The New York Times’, and besides, I know for a fact that it’s more ele­gant and more use­ful than it was before.

And though Khoi says that he is not respon­si­ble for the design, it’s clear to me that who­ever is was heav­ily influ­enced by his work – espe­cially the recent re-launch of The Onion. Bravo!