Tag Archive for 'nytimes'

Packer & Bilton, on Twitter

It’s been fun fol­low­ing the debate between the Times Bits blog­ger Nick Bil­ton, and New York­er staff writer George Pack­er, on whether Twit­ter is a god­send, or a har­bin­ger of doom.

Pack­er opened with a dec­la­ra­tion that he’s old school:

I don’t have a Black­Ber­ry, or an iPhone, or a Google phone, and I don’t intend to get an iPad. I’ve been care­ful not to men­tion this to sources in Wash­ing­ton, where con­ver­sa­tion con­sists of two peo­ple occa­sion­al­ly glanc­ing up from their Black­Ber­ries and say­ing, ‘I’m lis­ten­ing.’

After point­ing out recent news sto­ries that Twit­ter had a hand in breaking—Iran, Haiti, Obama’s Elec­tion—Bil­ton fires back:

…when trains were a new tech­nol­o­gy 150 years ago, some jour­nal­ists and intel­lec­tu­als wor­ried about the destruc­tion that the rail­roads would bring to soci­ety…

I won­der if, 150 years ago, Mr. Pack­er would be rid­ing the train at all, or if he would have stayed home, afraid to engage in an evolv­ing soci­ety and demand­ing that the trains be stopped.

Ouch. One gets the sense that there is some kind of gen­er­a­tional clash going on here. Pack­er tries again:

If a Lud­dite is some­one who fears and hates all tech­no­log­i­cal change, a Bil­tonite is some­one who cel­e­brates all tech­no­log­i­cal change: because we can, we must.

George is ask­ing the right ques­tions, but it’s hard to dis­agree with Bilton’s point—by refus­ing to par­tic­i­pate in social media, he’s miss­ing part of the sto­ry… you can’t bury your head in the sand and expect to keep up.

The Times Wins 5 Pulitzer Prizes

NY Times newsroom, Pulitzer announcement
Photo by Soraya.

The New York Times, my employ­er, won 5 Pulitzer Prizes today, “for work on sub­jects as var­ied as America’s wars in Asia, the sud­den down­fall of a polit­i­cal titan, art from ancient to mod­ern, and a his­to­ry-mak­ing pres­i­den­tial cam­paign.”

The inter­est­ing one, from my point of view, is the award for break­ing the Gov. Eliot Spitzer pros­ti­tu­tion scan­dal. No, not because it’s sala­cious or bawdy, but because the exclu­sive wasn’t held for the next morning’s paper – it was put up online, on NYTimes.com, in the mid­dle of the day. I think that this will be an impor­tant mile­stone in the evo­lu­tion of qual­i­ty jour­nal­ism.

The Nie­man Lab points to a fun­ny anec­dote that ran in the NY Observ­er last year:

Back in the day — you know, five years ago — when a big news sto­ry had been writ­ten, edit­ed, fact-checked, vet­ted, proof­read, and anguished over one last time, an adren­a­line-pumped edi­tor would cry out, “Run it!” As in, the press­es.

When The New York Times was ready to report that Eliot Spitzer, then gov­er­nor of New York, had been impli­cat­ed in a pros­ti­tu­tion ring, man­ag­ing edi­tor Jill Abram­son yelled 20 feet across the news­room, “O.K., hit it!” As in, the but­ton to pub­lish the sto­ry on NYTimes.com.

I love that. Con­grats to my col­leagues in the news room, and let’s keep it up!

David Letterman Got Married

Wow: David Let­ter­man got mar­ried!

The Times on Brooklyn Food, Frank Bruni on Buttermilk Channel

Today’s Times Din­ing sec­tion has some great cov­er­age of Brook­lyn food. First, there is a great arti­cle on food pro­duc­ers through­out the bor­ough:

These Brook­lynites, most in their 20s and 30s, are hand-mak­ing pick­les, cheeses and choco­lates the way oth­ers form bands and artists’ col­lec­tives. They have a sense of com­mu­ni­ty and an appre­ci­a­tion for tra­di­tion­al meth­ods and fla­vors. They also share an aes­thet­ic that’s equal parts 19th and 21st cen­tu­ry, with a taste for bold graph­ics, sal­vaged wood and, for the men, scruffy beards.

Make sure to check out the inter­ac­tive map, too.

Also, Frank Bruni reviews one of my favorite new restau­rants near our home in Brook­lyn, But­ter­milk Chan­nel, along with an audio slideshow:

But­ter­milk Chan­nel [is] a restau­rant of real stan­dards, note­wor­thy ambi­tion and uncom­mon slav­ish­ness to trends. It’s laud­able and pre­dictable in equal mea­sures. And it was packed every time I went…

The look of the restau­rant, whose cor­ner loca­tion affords it pret­ty win­dows on two sides, is on the pol­ished side of homey. There’s nice­ly buffed wood, a spi­dery brass light­ing fix­ture and a hon­eyed glow from it and hand­some sconces along the walls.

There’s also ample space between tables: the own­er, Doug Crow­ell, isn’t try­ing just to jam in as many peo­ple as pos­si­ble. But he does ask you to trade some com­fort and con­ve­nience for the refresh­ing­ly low prices.

These few blocks on Court Street are start­ing to fill with inter­est­ing and tasty culi­nary oper­a­tions: But­ter­milk Chan­nel, Frankie’s Spunti­no, and the new­ly opened and not-yet-vis­it­ed soon to open Prime Meats.

UPDATE: The Times post­ed a Q & A between read­ers and sub­jects of the Brook­lynite food pro­duc­ers piece.

Michael Bierut on the Move from the “Drawing Board to the Desktop”

From Michael Bierut’s piece in the Times this week­end, Draw­ing Board to the Desk­top: A Designer’s Path:

All of us assumed that these machines [com­put­ers] were just fan­cy hybrids of type­writ­ers and cal­cu­la­tors. We did all the art­work with rub­ber cement, col­ored paper and paint. We had no idea, but we were look­ing at the begin­ning of the end, and the end came quick­ly.

Michael is a part­ner at Pen­ta­gram, and blogs reg­u­lar­ly at Design Observ­er.

The Weekender

This is a pret­ty good par­o­dy of the New York Times Week­ender com­mer­cials, that play on basic cable sta­tions through­out the Tri-State area and New Eng­land. Appear­ances by Paul Rudd, Eugene Mir­man, and The State/Stel­la alum­ni Michael Ian Black, Michael Showal­ter and David Wain. It makes me want to go see some com­e­dy at 92YTribeca.

Also, I must find some­thing besides the Times to blog about.

[via NYMag]

U.S. Airways Jet Crashes Into Hudson River

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue

My photo from the 21st floor of the New York Times Building, in midtown.

From City Room:

A USAir­ways plane that took off at 3:26 p.m. from La Guardia Air­port land­ed in the Hud­son Riv­er five min­utes lat­er, where it remains most­ly sub­merged. Fer­ries and oth­er boats con­verged to help with a res­cue effort, as the plane drift­ed south. There was no imme­di­ate infor­ma­tion about the 151 peo­ple on board.

Accord­ing to Chan­nel 4 tele­vi­sion news, the plane, USAir­ways flight 1549, took off from LaGuardia Air­port at 3:26 p.m. was bound for Char­lotte, N.C. and had 146 pas­sen­gers and 5 crew mem­bers. The plane, accord­ing to the news report, may have hit a flock of birds. The pilot tried to return to the air­port when the plane fell into the Hud­son.

US Airways Plane Crash & Rescue
Photo of the rescue, posted by Janis Krums on Twitter/Twitpic.

I watched from the 21st floor of the Times Build­ing, as the plan drift­ed south with the tide. I believe that the res­cue oper­a­tion com­plet­ed before it came into view, and it has since drift­ed out of view.

The plane did not break up on impact; divers, com­muter fer­ries and a lot of emer­gency per­son­nel are assist­ing with res­cue oper­a­tions. Every­one is report­ed to have sur­vived the crash and res­cue, as of this moment, but there are injuries. CNN is cur­rent­ly inter­view­ing pas­sen­gers, live on-air.

UPDATE: I don’t know how the Graph­ics team put this togeth­er so quick­ly and so ele­gant­ly, but NYTimes.com has an inter­ac­tive piece today, that tracks the plane’s path.

Also, CNN has been run­ning a Google Earth ani­ma­tion of the flight, which is less pret­ty, but kind of cool.

Design Loves a Depression

Vermelha Chair

This past week­end, The New York Times Week in Review argues in a sto­ry head­lined Design Loves a Depres­sion that the recent eco­nom­ic slow­down will force design­ers to eschew nov­el­ty and the imprac­ti­cal, and focus more on the “intel­li­gent rework­ing of cur­rent con­di­tions”:

Design tends to thrive in hard times. In the scarci­ty of the 1940s, Charles and Ray Eames pro­duced fur­ni­ture and oth­er prod­ucts of endur­ing appeal from cheap mate­ri­als like plas­tic, resin and ply­wood, and Ital­ian design flow­ered in the after­math of World War II.

Will today’s design­ers rise to the occa­sion? “What design­ers do real­ly well is work with­in con­straints, work with what they have,” said Pao­la Antonel­li, senior cura­tor of archi­tec­ture and design at the Muse­um of Mod­ern Art. “This might be the time when design­ers can real­ly do their job, and do it in a human­is­tic spir­it.”

Relat­ed: Design­ing Through the Reces­sion, by design­er Michael Bierut

UPDATE: Mur­ray Moss takes the WIR to task in a piece today on Design Observ­er:

Design loves a depres­sion? I can assure you that design, along with paint­ing, sculp­ture, pho­tog­ra­phy, music, dance, fash­ion, the culi­nary arts, archi­tec­ture, and the­atre, loves a depres­sion no more than it loves a war, a flood, or a plague. Michael Cannell’s arti­cle is regres­sive and mean-spir­it­ed, and it demands a response.

…quite a pro­vok­ing dis­cus­sion.

Image courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Saving Buffalo’s Untold Beauty

Downtown Buffalo

Photo Credit: Tony Cenicola/The New York TimesA photo of downtown Buffalo.

The Times had a great piece yes­ter­day on Buffalo’s archi­tec­tur­al lega­cy, and recent attempts to save his­toric build­ings:

Buf­fa­lo is home to some of the great­est Amer­i­can archi­tec­ture of the late 19th and ear­ly 20th cen­turies, with major archi­tects like Hen­ry Hob­son Richard­son, Fred­er­ick Law Olm­st­ed, Louis Sul­li­van and Frank Lloyd Wright build­ing mar­vels here. Togeth­er they shaped one of the grand­est ear­ly visions of the demo­c­ra­t­ic Amer­i­can city.

Yet Buf­fa­lo is more com­mon­ly iden­ti­fied with the crum­bling infra­struc­ture, aban­doned homes and dwin­dling jobs that have defined the Rust Belt for the past 50 years. And for decades its archi­tec­ture has seemed strange­ly frozen in time.

There is also an accom­pa­ny­ing slide show, from which the pho­to above was tak­en.

Full dis­clo­sure: I’m orig­i­nal­ly from Buf­fa­lo.

Grant Park — Alex Wright

My col­league at NYTimes.com, Alex Wright, hap­pened to be in Chica­go last night, so he made his way to the Grant Park cel­e­bra­tion. I’m sure that will be a moment to remem­ber for some time.

Who Said Print is Dead?

OBAMA
Today’s edition of the New York Times.

I count myself lucky today, for scor­ing a copy of the paper before they ran out. Appar­ent­ly, the sit­u­a­tion is the same through­out the city, (though I’ve heard rumors of anoth­er 50,000 copy run).

In fact, there are a hun­dred or so peo­ple stand­ing on line out­side the Times head­quar­ters, wait­ing for a fresh deliv­ery of news, print­ed on dead trees.

Print Isn’t Dead

A hundred or so people, waiting on line for today’s paper, in front of the Times headquarters in midtown.

From Gawk­er:

Every­body wants a sou­venir of Obama’s vic­to­ry, and you know what makes a great sou­venir? That’s right, a news­pa­per. This is a pho­to of a line out­side the NYT build­ing on 40th Street of peo­ple waiting—for a news­pa­per!

I hope that peo­ple still come to the Times for more than just a sou­venir.

New York Times Anthrax Scare

Who?

Equipment and officials from some government agency that I’ve never heard of, in the lobby of the New York Times Building in midtown.

The lob­by of The New York Times Build­ing, where I work, was closed this past Wednes­day, after an employ­ee on the 13th floor opened an enve­lope that con­tained a pow­dery sub­stance. (The 13th floor is where the edi­to­r­i­al board and some colum­nists have offices.)

It turned out to be a hoax, but for sev­er­al hours the build­ing was in near lock-down mode. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, I decid­ed to dis­re­gard warn­ings and went out to meet Lisa for lunch. When I returned, I was locked out for almost an hour, as the police had roped off the building’s entrances. Peer­ing through the win­dows on the 8th Avenue side of the build­ing, I saw a huge cur­tain stretched across one of the ele­va­tor banks. Some fire­men went in with a stretch­er, and the broad­cast news media start­ed con­verg­ing on the street. (Apolo­gies to the very friend­ly NY1 cam­er­a­woman, for refus­ing to talk to her on cam­era.)

All I could do was to take some pho­tos, and wait to be let in. After about an hour, I received word from a col­league inside that they were let­ting employ­ees back in through the freight ele­va­tors in the load­ing dock down 40th st. That was about all the fun I could han­dle for one day… back to work.

More Pho­tos below the jump.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘New York Times Anthrax Scare’

How Hackers Show it’s Not All Bad News at the New York Times

Apolo­gies that this blog looks a lit­tle New York Times-y late­ly, but I had to share this – O’Reilly’s Andrew Savikas wrote a very inter­est­ing post on some of the inter­est­ing stuff we’re doing:

…there‘s some­thing going on at the Times that prob­a­bly won‘t make it to Sil­i­con Alley Insid­er, much less the main­stream busi­ness press, and it‘s some­thing that‘s start­ing to make me think the Times just might suc­ceed in adapt­ing to the chang­ing rules of the media and pub­lish­ing game…

So what’s the Times doing that’s so impor­tant? They’re hack­ing.

Savikas goes on to list a lot of exam­ples, but the best one that I can pro­vide is the com­ing release of our APIs, which will enable peo­ple on the out­side to play, tin­ker, and mashup NY Times con­tent. There are only a few APIs cur­rent­ly pub­lic, but there will be a flood of releas­es in the com­ing months.

[via Jere­my]

UPDATE: Oh man, a bit after I pub­lished this today, we launched our Visu­al­iza­tion Lab – a part­ner­ship that uses IBM’s Many Eyes tech­nol­o­gy. More Info Here »

This Election’s Poster Child

Design crit­ic Steven Heller looks at poster design this pres­i­den­tial elec­tion cycle, and the unprece­dent­ed out­pour­ing of sup­port for Sen­a­tor Barack Oba­ma:

So, do these posters have any impact on vot­ers? Not the spe­cif­ic images or mes­sages but cumu­la­tive­ly they are a grass­roots effort that excite through the show of col­lec­tive sup­port. What’s more, posters often appeal to per­son­al needs and emo­tions, not all rouse in the same way for every­one. Hav­ing many options allows par­ti­sans to engage as they choose. This show of sup­port goes in the plus col­umn for Barack Oba­ma.

Take a walk down Smith Street in Brook­lyn, and you’ll see Shep­ard Fairey’s poster in many shop win­dows – it’s almost com­ic… not just street art any more.

Christoph Niemann’s Abstract City

One of my favorite blogs on NYTimes.com is writ­ten by the Ger­man illus­tra­tor Christoph Nie­mann, called Abstract City. He only posts once a month or so, but each one is as unique and inter­est­ing as the last.

And, it is amus­ing that his blog – of all NYTimes.com blogs – doesn’t have an illus­trat­ed icon in the head­er. It’s not inten­tion­al on our part, he just hasn’t got­ten to it yet.

See More of Christoph Niemann’s work »

Ready for David Pogue

Shadows
Me, standing in, as lighting is set for a David Pogue shoot.

Today, myself and a few col­leagues helped Zach Wise set up and shoot some green screen video of New York Times Tech­nol­o­gy Colum­nist and near-Broad­way per­former David Pogue. The video will be inte­grat­ed into a mul­ti­me­dia piece that Zach and I are work­ing on, which should be done before Thanks­giv­ing.

This is the first real video shoot that I’ve worked on, (hav­ing in the past done a lot of voice-over work with sound engi­neers). What’s scary is that we did this large­ly by our­selves – Zach found a stu­dio at the near­by CUNY Grad­u­ate School of Jour­nal­ism, we hung the green fab­ric, and we set up the light­ing with a lit­tle help from their engi­neer.

David Pogue came in a short while lat­er, I grabbed a boom mic, and we were off to the races. It was a lot of fun, and Pogue nailed the takes – I have no idea how he did it with­out a teleprompter, but he had us all laugh­ing sev­er­al times. And he was very patient and friend­ly through­out the shoot, even when we had to embar­rass­ing­ly scram­ble back to the office for more P2 cards.

So, that was the hard part – now we have to design and build this thing.

The Measure of a President

The Times has an inter­est­ing (if not com­plete­ly point­less) info­graph­ic on pres­i­den­tial height and weight, in recent his­to­ry. I like that the sil­hou­ettes are all most­ly rec­og­niz­able – Jim­my Carter’s smile, Har­ry Truman’s spec­ta­cles and William Howard Taft’s bel­ly… fun­ny.

It was done by Scott Stowell’s design stu­dio, Open N.Y., the peo­ple who design GOOD Mag­a­zine.

MSM Ahead of Curve on V.P. Debate

Did you know that NYTimes.com streamed live video of last night’s debate, right on the top of its home page? There was a full-screen option, too. Pret­ty cool stuff – even Gawk­er was impressed.

Also, check out our V.P. Debati­na­tor – a mashup of video, tran­script, and time­line from the debate.

Economix & Green Inc. Blog Headers

The Times is in the process of beef­ing up its busi­ness cov­er­age online, adding new ver­ti­cals on the econ­o­my and green ener­gy. As part of that roll out, we launched two blogs last week, and I was tasked with the head­er designs and illus­tra­tion assign­ments.

I real­ly enjoy the lit­tle bits of art direc­tion that I get to do at the Times. It’s fun to search for the illus­tra­tors, work with them on con­cepts and sketch­es, and in the end they do all of the work.

Economix

Economix Blog header
Illustration by Headcase Design

Economix is writ­ten by David Leon­hardt and Cather­ine Ram­pell, and will focus on both the glob­al econ­o­my and the per­son­al deci­sions read­ers make every­day.

The illus­tra­tion was done by Paul Kepple’s team at Head­case Design, with art direc­tion and design by myself.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Economix & Green Inc. Blog Head­ers’

nytimes.com Outage

Graham

Reaction from Twitter user Graham Mudd, on the nytimes.com outage this afternoon.

Nytimes.com has been down for about an hour, and thank­ful­ly it wasn’t my turn to watch it. I haven’t heard of any expla­na­tion yet, but it could be any­thing from prob­lems with DNS or our CDN. Who knows? I’m just a design­er here.

It seems like just yes­ter­day, when every­one was com­plain­ing about recent down­time trou­bles at Twit­ter and Ama­zon, includ­ing us.

Adrienne
Despite Adrienne Shaffer’s tweet, we’re housebroken, I swear!

Hope­ful­ly this is just a tem­po­rary blip. But, I had a good time read­ing people’s tweets.

6:27 pm UPDATE: The site is most­ly up, but some func­tion­al­i­ty is not work­ing, such as Search.

The Fold”

Chris Fahey on “the fold”:

In fact, we should start think­ing of “the fold” as some­thing oth­er than a hard line with an “above” and “below” por­tion, and we should stop think­ing of the ver­ti­cal posi­tion­ing on a page as equiv­a­lent to pri­or­i­ty. Scrolling up and down through a web page is a fun­da­men­tal aspect of the web user expe­ri­ence, and there is much more to it than sim­ply see­ing what’s on top and then grad­u­al­ly see­ing every­thing else (empha­sis added).

I have no doubt that this is increas­ing­ly true, but won­der why ads are con­sis­tent­ly placed “above the fold”. Is this just a rem­nant of this old­er think­ing, or do they per­form sig­nif­i­cant­ly bet­ter there?

A 3rd Climber

Peel

Workmen remove a flyer left behind by David Malone, who climbed the New York Times Building several hours before.

For the third time in five weeks, some­one has scaled the out­side of The New York Times Head­quar­ters. This time, how­ev­er, it was over and done before most of us got out of bed:

Unlike the two pre­vi­ous climbers, this one — iden­ti­fied lat­er as David Mal­one, a 29-year-old activist from West Hart­ford, Conn., who stud­ies Al Qae­da — did not attempt to make his way to the roof. Instead, he unfurled a ban­ner around the fifth floor of the 52-sto­ry build­ing, before climb­ing a few more sto­ries.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘A 3rd Climber’

The Big Picture

NYTimes.com isn’t the only NYT prop­er­ty that’s doing inter­est­ing things with blogs these days – Boston.com launched a dif­fer­ent kind of pho­to blog ear­li­er this month, The Big Pic­ture. With its over­sized pho­tos, min­i­mal ads, and hard­ly a pro­mo to oth­er site con­tent, the pre­sen­ta­tion is clear and strik­ing – and praise is pour­ing in.

California Fires

Firefighters work to contain the Humboldt fire which started Wednesday, had grown to 19,000 acres and threatened more than 5,000 structures. (AP Photo/Jason Halley — Chico Enterprise-Record)

Anoth­er inter­est­ing facet about the blog is that it not writ­ten by a Globe pho­tog­ra­ph­er or pho­to edi­tor, but by one of their web­site devel­op­ers. Andy Baio post­ed a great inter­view with the blog’s cre­ator and author, Alan Tay­lor, where he dis­cuss­es his inspi­ra­tion, method­ol­o­gy, and what it’s like being a web devel­op­er work­ing in a journalist’s world. When asked why more news­pa­per sites haven’t done this before, he replied:

Even some of my favorite pho­to sites are often lim­it­ed to ‘Pho­to of the Day’ or ‘24 Hours in Pic­tures’ fea­tures. That’s inter­est­ing, and you can find some mind-blow­ing images there, but I always felt like it lacked con­text, depth, sto­ry.”

Iowa Floods

Brandon Smith carries his two cats, Fry and Bender, to dry land from their flooded and evacuated home on June 12, 2008 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Photo by David Greedy/Getty Images)

As we move to an age where motion graph­ics and video reg­u­lar­ly enhance our tra­di­tion­al news pre­sen­ta­tion, it’s inter­est­ing to take a step back and con­sid­er the pow­er still pho­tog­ra­phy has to tell a sto­ry. And work­ing online with­out the space con­straint of print, news orga­ni­za­tions have an oppor­tu­ni­ty to bring more depth and con­text to read­ers, through excel­lent pho­to­jour­nal­ism.

Infographics

I com­plet­ed a three-day inten­sive news­room ori­en­ta­tion last week, in which the new faces at the Times are trained on poli­cies, prac­tices, and quirks of the paper. It’s an onboard­ing pro­ce­dure the likes of which I’ve nev­er gone through in my career, and I think it’s a cred­it to the orga­ni­za­tion that they care so much about its tra­di­tions and cul­ture to invest so much time and ener­gy wel­com­ing new peo­ple.

In addi­tion to the sem­i­nars on sourc­ing, ethics and back­ground, it was espe­cial­ly inter­est­ing to meet all of the Desk Edi­tors and learn how they run their teams both online and in print. One-by-one, they filed in from Nation­al, Style, Trav­el, For­eign, the Mag­a­zines… it was a whirl­wind 3 days.

infographic
Deadly Rampage at Virginia Tech, updated April 23, 2007

One of the most inter­est­ing half-hours was pre­sent­ed by Archie Tse, a Graph­ics edi­tor. Archie explained how the Times Graph­ics Desk is real­ly unique among news orga­ni­za­tions, in that they go out and do report­ing before sit­ting down at their com­put­er.

When you con­sid­er that news­pa­pers are cut­ting back on cov­er­age of every­thing these days, this is remark­able.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Info­graph­ics’

Alain Robert, climbing the New York Times Building

Nev­er a dull moment here at the Times… Today, we wit­nessed Alain Robert climb the New York Times Build­ing on 8th Avenue fac­ing 41st street. I took this with my iPhone on the 21st floor:

Alain Robert

He scaled up the ceram­ic rods that are affixed to the out­side of the build­ing, attract­ing hun­dreds of onlook­ers inside the build­ing, as well as down the street.

City Room has more about Alain and this stunt, includ­ing the news that he was arrest­ed by NYPD after reach­ing the roof – 52 floors up from the street.

Con­tin­ue read­ing ‘Alain Robert, climb­ing the New York Times Build­ing’