Tag Archive for 'nytimes'

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Farewell Sean & Louise

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Cupcakes! – Photo by Villafranca.

This week, the nytimes.com Design group says farewell to two really talented colleagues – Sean Villafranca and Louise Ma. Sean is leaving to become Design Director at time.com, and Louise is going to freelance, full-time.

I’m still new around these parts, but Sean and Louise made me feel at home. We’re going to miss you guys! (But, we are hiring…)

Continue reading ‘Farewell Sean & Louise’

McCain’s Optimum Look

Can a typeface truly represent a presidential candidate? Yesterday on the Times’ Campaign Stops blog, Steven Heller invited several designers and critics to comment on John McCain’s use of Optima for campaign collateral.

Is it dated? Classic? Does it convey strength? Or, quirkiness? The replies run the gamut; many of them funny or tongue-in-cheek. Michael Beirut notes the font’s resemblance to the one used to carve the names on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, and Matthew Carter muses about how the typeface will hold up with the addition of a running mate this summer. But, my favorite judgement comes at the end, from Rudy VanderLans:

What does Optima say about Senator McCain? Nothing. It probably says more about the designer than anything else. Who, except designers, would judge a candidate by the typeface?

Oh, and earlier this month, Heller did a similar discussion with branding expert Brian Collins, on Obama’s Gotham-heavy design scheme.

Google Earth in 3D

Google Earth now has 3D-buildings, and it’s really fun to play with. Here is the Times Building, where I work:

Times Building

A 3D rendering of the New York Times Building in Midtown, as shown in Google Earth.

If you have Google Earth installed, see it for yourself. Or, try landing on the deck of the Golden Gate Bridge, (just zoom in).

There seems to be data for a lot of cities, including my home town of Buffalo, and former home of Boston.

Polling Place Photo Project

If you’re going to vote tomorrow on Super Tuesday, consider documenting your experience for all to see. The Polling Place Photo Project, an experiment in citizen journalism that “encourages voters to capture, post and share photographs of this year’s primaries, caucuses and general election.”

William Drenttel initiated the project during the 2006 midterm elections, and for this election year The New York Times and AIGA have partnered to expand it.

Primaries or Caucuses will be held in 24 states on February 5 – take a photo of your polling place, and share it with the world. And don’t forget to browse through some photos, too!

2/5 UPDATE: Here is a link to my photos on the PPPP site.

New Hampshire

It’s New Hampshire Primary Day, (already?!), but I’m not going to make any predictions. Hillary? Obama? McCain? Huckabee? The polls have swung dramatically in the past week or so, in both parties. And, it seems that the country is coming to one of those cultural tipping points that only occur once or twice per generation.

Some have compared this cycle to the election years of 1992, 1980, 1960… But, perhaps it’s more like the first months of 1968, before the assassinations of Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. derailed all hope, as well as the campaign of Eugene McCarthy. We find ourselves in an unpopular war that nobody knows how to get out of, saddled with an lame duck President with low approval ratings, and no sitting Vice President in the race, and we’re facing some economic uncertainty ahead. Still, there is hope on both sides of the aisle.

Is it a generational tipping point? Are we as a nation heading toward a year much like that annus horribilis of 1968? Nobody knows at this point, but maybe it’s best not to look back for comparisons – everyone across the political spectrum is eager to move forward.

Continue reading ‘New Hampshire’

The New NYTimes.com

The New York Times launched a modest redesign over the weekend, and it does a great job of presenting large amounts of information in a coherent, organized way.

new NYTimes.com

The new homepage of NYTimes.com.

Khoi has the details on his weblog:

I think it’s a sterling piece of work, a great example of how to evolve a user experience rather than reinvent it: the best reaction it could receive from readers (those not among that vanishingly small subset of the general populace who can be called “design savvy”) would be something along the lines of “The new design looks just like the old design.” That would suit me fine, because it would signal a continuity that I think is completely appropriate for such a closely watched site like The New York Times’, and besides, I know for a fact that it’s more elegant and more useful than it was before.

And though Khoi says that he is not responsible for the design, it’s clear to me that whoever is was heavily influenced by his work – especially the recent re-launch of The Onion. Bravo!

Waitin’ Tables

Can’t help but pass along this Remainder from Jason Kottke – NY Times food critic Frank Bruni spends a week “undercover” as a waiter at a [Cambridge] restaurant. In the end, he realizes the hell that is being a waiter:

trying to be fluent in the menu and the food, calm in the face of chaos, patient in the presence of rudeness, available when diners want that, invisible when they don’t. It’s a lot, and I should remember that.

Does this realization dampen his dining expectations? Nope:

I’d still like frequent water refills. And a martini from hell. Straight up.

It reminds me of the polite little arguments Presley & I have on whether or not to leave 20%, even when receiving shitty service. Though I never advocate leaving less than 15%, I also think that the bonus tip should be reserved for competent, polite servers. What’s wrong with that?

My Electoral Nightmare

I was fooling around with this neat New York Times interactive Election Guide, and I inputted my predictions for how the states will vote in November.

This was my worst-case scenario, with Bush winning both Florida and Ohio… the result? TIED.

It’ll be the House of Representatives rather than the Supreme Court, this time around…