Tag Archive for 'typography'

Buttermilk’ Font, From Jessica Hische

‘Buttermilk’ Font, From Jessica Hische
Buttermilk’, from Jessica Hische.

Illustrator/Designer Jes­si­ca His­che released her first type­face today, and it looks gor­geous. But­ter­milk is a “bold script that would be just per­fect for mag­a­zine head­lines, book title type, hol­i­day cards, ini­tial caps, you name it.”

The numer­als are espe­cial­ly beau­ti­ful, and she promis­es a “huge array of lig­a­tures to help you set it beau­ti­ful­ly and eas­i­ly.”

I worked with Jes­si­ca last fall on a nice retro logo for the Pogue-o-mat­ic. Be sure to check out Jessica’s work, (I’m par­tic­u­lar­ly fond of her let­ter­press stuff.)

Introducing Typekit

Jeff Veen announced Type­kit today, a host­ed solu­tion for embed­ding fonts on the web:

We’ve been work­ing with foundries to devel­op a con­sis­tent web-only font link­ing license. We’ve built a tech­nol­o­gy plat­form that lets us to host both free and com­mer­cial fonts in a way that is incred­i­bly fast, smoothes out dif­fer­ences in how browsers han­dle type, and offers the lev­el of pro­tec­tion that type design­ers need with­out resort­ing to annoy­ing and inef­fec­tive DRM.

Soon enough, @font-face CSS at-rule sup­port will come to all major browsers, so use of non-tra­di­tion­al web fonts will increase. If this catch­es on, the web in 2010 might look a lot dif­fer­ent than it does now—I won­der who will be the first major online con­tent provider to use it?

A New Whitehouse.gov, and New Typefaces

As of noon today, we have a new pres­i­dent, as well as a new WhiteHouse.gov. The much-admired, Gotham-based typo­graph­i­cal iden­ti­ty is gone, but as Jason San­ta Maria points out, the design­ers went instead with two oth­er type­faces from the same foundry: Whit­ney and Hoe­fler Text.

Anoth­er major redesign this week also involved the use of Whit­ney: kottke.org – though you’ll need to have the font installed on your machine in order to see it.

Which begs the ques­tion, Is Whit­ney the new Gotham? (Seems like just yes­ter­day we were ask­ing, Is Gotham the New Inter­state?)

Hoefler+Frere-Jones is on a roll.

The Mostly True Story of Helvetica and the New York City Subway

The Most­ly True Sto­ry of Hel­veti­ca and the New York City Sub­way:

There is a com­mon­ly held belief that Hel­veti­ca is the sig­nage type­face of the New York City sub­way sys­tem, a belief rein­forced by Hel­veti­ca, Gary Hustwit’s pop­u­lar 2007 doc­u­men­tary about the type­face. But it is not true—or rather, it is only some­what true. Hel­veti­ca is the offi­cial type­face of the MTA today, but it was not the type­face spec­i­fied by Uni­mark Inter­na­tion­al when it cre­at­ed a new sig­nage sys­tem at the end of the 1960s.

r-train
R-train icon, set in Helvetica and Standard.

I noticed this dis­crep­an­cy ear­li­er this year – I had to recre­ate some MTA sub­way icons for use on a project, and noticed that the R train map icon looked noth­ing like the Hel­veti­ca “R”. The MTA’s own web­site seems to be con­fused about the type used in the sys­tem icons, let alone its sta­tion sig­nage.

Enter typog­ra­ph­er Paul Shaw, and his 10,000+ word piece on AIGA’s site. Did you now that Boston’s sub­way sig­nage sys­tem was the first to use Hel­veti­ca, with­out mod­i­fi­ca­tions? Ever curi­ous as to the process by which enam­el signs are made? Want to just look at pret­ty pic­tures of sub­way signs over the years?

It’s a great his­to­ry, for fans of typog­ra­phy and the MTA.

Mad Men, Mad Props

Mad Men is such an enjoy­able show – but, type­face design­er Mark Simon­son takes Mad Men’s prop mas­ters to task for their typog­ra­phy sins.

None of these mis­steps occurred to me when watch­ing, so maybe I need to brush up on my his­to­ry of typog­ra­phy?

Font Conference

What if fonts were peo­ple? A fun­ny video from the gang at CollegeHumor.com.

McCain’s Optimum Look

Can a type­face tru­ly rep­re­sent a pres­i­den­tial can­di­date? Yes­ter­day on the Times’ Cam­paign Stops blog, Steven Heller invit­ed sev­er­al design­ers and crit­ics to com­ment on John McCain’s use of Opti­ma for cam­paign col­lat­er­al.

Is it dat­ed? Clas­sic? Does it con­vey strength? Or, quirk­i­ness? The replies run the gamut; many of them fun­ny or tongue-in-cheek. Michael Beirut notes the font’s resem­blance to the one used to carve the names on the Viet­nam Vet­er­ans Memo­r­i­al, and Matthew Carter mus­es about how the type­face will hold up with the addi­tion of a run­ning mate this sum­mer. But, my favorite judge­ment comes at the end, from Rudy Van­der­Lans:

What does Opti­ma say about Sen­a­tor McCain? Noth­ing. It prob­a­bly says more about the design­er than any­thing else. Who, except design­ers, would judge a can­di­date by the type­face?

Oh, and ear­li­er this month, Heller did a sim­i­lar dis­cus­sion with brand­ing expert Bri­an Collins, on Obama’s Gotham-heavy design scheme.

Brooklyn Neighborhood Poster, by Ork Posters

Brooklyn Neighborhood Poster, by Ork PostersI love this typo­graph­i­cal poster of Brook­lyn neigh­bor­hoods, by Ork Posters of Chica­go.

It won’t help me fig­ure out the “offi­cial” bound­aries of Car­roll Gar­dens, but it sure is pret­ty.

[via swiss­miss]